Gore Vidal

(1925-2012 / West Point, New York)

Gore Vidal Quotes

  • ''Many writers who choose to be active in the world lose not virtue but time, and that stillness without which literature cannot be made.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. Réalités (Aug. 1966). "That is sad," Vidal added, "until one recalls how many bad books the world may yet be spared because of the busyness of writers."
    1 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''There is something about a bureaucrat that does not like a poem.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. Sex, Death and Money, preface (1968).
  • ''There is no such thing as a homosexual or a heterosexual person. There are only homo- or heterosexual acts. Most people are a mixture of impulses if not practices.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. "Tennessee Williams: Someone to Laugh at the Squares With," sct. 1, Armageddon? Essays 1983-1987 (1987).
  • ''On September 16, 1985, when the Commerce Department announced that the United States had become a debtor nation, the American Empire died.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. "The Day the American Empire Ran Out of Gas," Armageddon? Essays 1983-1987 (1987).
  • ''Now the long-feared Asiatic colossus takes its turn as world leader, and we—the white race—have become the yellow man's burden. Let us hope that he will treat us more kindly than we treated him.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. "The Day the American Empire Ran Out of Gas," Armageddon? Essays 1983-1987 (1987).
  • ''Never miss a chance to have sex or appear on television.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. Attributed, Macmillan Dictionary of Quotations (1989).
  • ''It is the spirit of the age to believe that any fact, no matter how suspect, is superior to any imaginative exercise, no matter how true.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. French Letters: Theories of the New Novel, Encounter (London, Dec. 1967).
  • ''Think of the earth as a living organism that is being attacked by billions of bacteria whose numbers double every forty years. Either the host dies, or the virus dies, or both die.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. repr. In A View from the Diner's Club (1991). "Gods and Greens," Observer (London, August 27, 1989).
  • ''Apparently, a democracy is a place where numerous elections are held at great cost without issues and with interchangeable candidates.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. repr. In A View from the Diner's Club (1991). "Gods and Greens," Observer (London, Aug. 27, 1989).
  • ''I find in most novels no imagination at all. They seem to think the highest form of the novel is to write about marriage, because that's the most important thing there is for middle-class people.''
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925), U.S. novelist, critic. Guardian (London, Nov. 2, 1989).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]