Gustave Flaubert

(1821-1880 / Rouen)

Gustave Flaubert Quotes

  • ''I live absolutely like an oyster.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Correspondance, letter, September 9, 1868, to George Sand, Conard (1926-1933).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''The finest works of art are those in which there is the least matter. The closer expression comes to thought, the more the word clings to the idea and disappears, the more beautiful the work of art.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Correspondance, letter, Jan. 16, 1852, to Louise Colet (1926). While writing Madame Bovary.
  • ''The cult of art gives pride; one never has too much of it.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. letter, February 23, 1873, to Mme. Gustave de Maupassant, trans. by William G. Allen. Correspondance, VII, p. 10, Conard (1926-1933).
  • ''The hand I burned and whose skin is shriveled like that of a mummy's is less sensitive than the other to cold or heat. My soul is the same; it passed through fire.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Correspondance, letter, spring 1847, to Louise Colet (1926).
  • ''Each dream finds at last its form; there is a drink for every thirst, and love for every heart. And there is no better way to spend your life than in the unceasing preoccupation of an idea—of an ideal.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Correspondance, vol. 1, letter, Jan. 14, 1857, to Elisa Schlesinger (1926). During the trial over Madame Bovary.
  • ''Poetry is as precise a thing as geometry.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Trans. by William G. Allen. Correspondance, letter, August 14, 1853, to Louise Colet, Conard (1926-1933).
  • ''Caught up in life, you see it badly. You suffer from it or enjoy it too much. The artist, in my opinion, is a monstrosity, something outside of nature.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Letter, December 15, 1850, to his mother, trans. by Stratton Buck (1966). Correspondance, II, p. 269, Conard (1926-1933). To his mother, in response to her question as to whether he intended to marry.
  • ''I had, as I told you, a great passion while still almost a child. When it was over, I divided myself in two, placing on one side the soul I kept for Art, and on the other, my body, which would have to fend for itself.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Correspondance, letter, autumn 1846, to Louise Colet (1926).
  • ''There are neither good nor bad subjects. From the point of view of pure Art, you could almost establish it as an axiom that the subject is irrelevant, style itself being an absolute manner of seeing things.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Correspondance, letter, Jan. 16, 1852, to Louise Colet. While writing Madame Bovary.
  • ''Oh, if I had been loved at the age of seventeen, what an idiot I would be today. Happiness is like smallpox: if you catch it too soon, it can completely ruin your constitution.''
    Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), French novelist. Letter, March 25-26, 1853, to Louise Colet, trans. by Stratton Buck (1966). Correspondance, III, p. 130, Conard (1926-1933).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]