Havelock Ellis


Havelock Ellis Quotes

  • ''To be a leader of men one must turn one's back on men.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. Against the Grain, introduction, Joris Karl Huysmans (1884).
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  • ''I always seem to have a vague feeling that he is a Satan among musicians, a fallen angel in the darkness who is perpetually seeking to fight his way back to happiness.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. Impressions and Comments, entry for Sept. 3, 1913 (1914). Referring to Beethoven.
  • ''It is curious how there seems to be an instinctive disgust in Man for his nearest ancestors and relations. If only Darwin could conscientiously have traced man back to the Elephant or the Lion or the Antelope, how much ridicule and prejudice would have been spared to the doctrine of Evolution.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. Impressions and Comments, entry for May 8, 1913 (1914).
  • ''All civilization has from time to time become a thin crust over a volcano of revolution.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. Little Essays of Love and Virtue, ch. 7 (1922).
  • ''Jealousy, that dragon which slays love under the pretence of keeping it alive.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. On Life and Sex: Essays of Love and Virtue, ch. 1 (1937).
  • ''It has always been difficult for Man to realise that his life is all an art. It has been more difficult to conceive it so than to act it so. For that is always how he has more or less acted it.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance Of Life, ch. 1 (1923).
  • ''We cannot be sure that we ought not to regard the most criminal country as that which in some aspects possesses the highest civilisation.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance of Life, ch. 7 (1923).
  • ''The sun, the moon and the stars would have disappeared long ago ... had they happened to be within the reach of predatory human hands.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance of Life, ch. 7 (1923).
  • ''A man must not swallow more beliefs than he can digest.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance of Life, ch. 5 (1923).
  • ''There is held to be no surer test of civilisation than the increase per head of the consumption of alcohol and tobacco. Yet alcohol and tobacco are recognisable poisons, so that their consumption has only to be carried far enough to destroy civilisation altogether.''
    Havelock Ellis (1859-1939), British psychologist. The Dance Of Life, ch. 7 (1923).

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