Helen Rowland

(1875–1950 / Washington, D.C)

Helen Rowland Quotes

  • ''Marriage is the operation by which a woman's vanity and a man's egotism are extracted without an anaesthetic.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Third Interlude," A Guide to Men (1922).
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  • ''It is easier to keep half a dozen lovers guessing than to keep one lover after he has stopped guessing.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Third Interlude," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''Falling in love consists merely in uncorking the imagination and bottling the common-sense.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Variations," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''France may claim the happiest marriages in the world, but the happiest divorces in the world are "made in America."''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "What Every Woman Wonders," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''A widow is a fascinating being with the flavor of maturity, the spice of experience, the piquancy of novelty, the tang of practised coquetry, and the halo of one man's approval.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Widows," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''Somehow, a bachelor never quite gets over the idea that he is a thing of beauty and a boy for ever!''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Bachelors," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''A Bachelor of Arts is one who makes love to a lot of women, and yet has the art to remain a bachelor.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Bachelors," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''A man can become so accustomed to the thought of his own faults that he will begin to cherish them as charming little "personal characteristics."''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Brides," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''Oh yes, there is a vast difference between the savage and the civilized man, but it is never apparent to their wives until after breakfast.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Cymbals and Kettle-drums," A Guide to Men (1922).
  • ''No girl who is going to marry need bother to win a college degree; she just naturally becomes a "Master of Arts" and a "Doctor of Philosophy" after catering to an ordinary man for a few years.''
    Helen Rowland (1875-1950), U.S. journalist. "Cymbals and Kettle-drums," A Guide to Men (1922).

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