Henry Alford

(1810-1871 / England)

Best Poem of Henry Alford

You And I

My hand is lonely for your clasping, dear;
My ear is tired waiting for your call.
I want your strength to help, your laugh to cheer;
Heart, soul and senses need you, one and all.
I droop without your full, frank sympathy;
We ought to be together - you and I;
We want each other so, to comprehend
The dream, the hope, things planned, or seen, or wrought.
Companion, comforter and guide and friend,
As much as love asks love, does thought ask thought.
Life is so short, so fast the lone hours fly,
We ought to be together, you and I.

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The Bride

'RISE,' said the Master, 'come unto the feast.'
She heard the call and rose with willing feet;
   But thinking it not otherwise than meet
For such a bidding to put on her best,
She is gone from us for a few short hours
   Into her bridal closet, there to wait
   For the unfolding of the palace gate
That gives her entrance to the blissful bowers.
We have not seen her yet, though we have been

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