Henry David Thoreau

(12 July 1817 – 6 May 1862 / Concord, Massachusetts)

Henry David Thoreau Quotes

  • ''To some extent, and at rare intervals, even I am a yogi.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, November 20, 1849, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 175, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''We slander the hyena; man is the fiercest and cruelest animal.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Paradise (To Be) Regained" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, pp. 283-284, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''In the meanest are all the materials of manhood, only they are not rightly disposed.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Service: Qualities of the Recruit" (1840), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 278, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''As for doing good, that is one of the professions which are full. Moreover, I have tried it fairly, and ... am satisfied that it does not agree with my constitution.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden, "Economy," (1854). Thoreau added, "If I knew for a certainty that a man was coming to my house with the conscious design of doing me good, I should run for my life."
  • ''Man is an animal who more than any other can adapt himself to all climates and circumstances.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 70, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''At most, it tolerates one annual loon.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 205, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''One may almost doubt if the wisest man has learned anything of absolute value by living.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 9, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''The wisest man preaches no doctrines; he has no scheme; he sees no rafter, not even a cobweb, against the heavens. It is clear sky.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, pp. 70-71, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Our taste is too delicate and particular. It says nay to the poet's work, but never yea to his hope.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 402, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Nothing can shock a brave man but dullness.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 304, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of Henry David Thoreau

Friendship

I think awhile of Love, and while I think,
Love is to me a world,
Sole meat and sweetest drink,
And close connecting link
Tween heaven and earth.

I only know it is, not how or why,
My greatest happiness;
However hard I try,
Not if I were to die,
Can I explain.

I fain would ask my friend how it can be,
But when the time arrives,
Then Love is more lovely
Than anything to me,
And so I'm dumb.

For if the truth were known, Love cannot speak,
But only thinks and does;
Though surely out 'twill leak
Without the help of...

Read the full of Friendship

I Am The Autumnal Sun

Sometimes a mortal feels in himself Nature
-- not his Father but his Mother stirs
within him, and he becomes immortal with her
immortality. From time to time she claims
kindredship with us, and some globule
from her veins steals up into our own.

I am the autumnal sun,
With autumn gales my race is run;

[Report Error]