Henry David Thoreau

(12 July 1817 – 6 May 1862 / Concord, Massachusetts)

Henry David Thoreau Quotes

  • ''We had not gone far before I was startled by seeing what I thought was an Indian encampment, covered with a red flag, on the bank, and exclaimed, "Camp!" to my comrades. I was slow to discover that it was a red maple changed by the frost.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Chesuncook" (1858) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 107, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
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  • ''One may be drunk with love without being any nearer to finding his mate.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Essay on "Love" in letter, September 1852, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 199, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''I am not afraid of praise, for I have practiced it on myself.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, March 13, 1856, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 277, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''A man's interest in a single bluebird is worth more than a complete but dry list of the fauna and flora of a town.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, November 22, 1858, to Daniel Ricketson, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 341, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Those things which now most engage the attention of men, as politics and the daily routine, are, it is true, vital functions of human society, but should be unconsciously performed, like the corresponding functions of the physical body.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Life Without Principle" (1863), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 481, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''I should have liked to come across a large community of pines, which had never been invaded by the lumbering army.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 232, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''There is a patent office at the seat of government of the universe, whose managers are as much interested in the dispersion of seeds as anybody at Washington can be, and their operations are infinitely more extensive and regular.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Succession of Forest Trees" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 187, Houghton Mifflin (1906). The U.S. Patent Office in Thoreau's day supplied samples of new seed varieties to farmers.
  • ''How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden, "Reading," (1854).
  • ''Nature has no human inhabitant who appreciates her.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 222, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''The purity men love is like the mists which envelop the earth, and not like the azure ether beyond.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 358, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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Best Poem of Henry David Thoreau

Friendship

I think awhile of Love, and while I think,
Love is to me a world,
Sole meat and sweetest drink,
And close connecting link
Tween heaven and earth.

I only know it is, not how or why,
My greatest happiness;
However hard I try,
Not if I were to die,
Can I explain.

I fain would ask my friend how it can be,
But when the time arrives,
Then Love is more lovely
Than anything to me,
And so I'm dumb.

For if the truth were known, Love cannot speak,
But only thinks and does;
Though surely out 'twill leak
Without the help of...

Read the full of Friendship

Epitaph On The World

Here lies the body of this world,
Whose soul alas to hell is hurled.
This golden youth long since was past,
Its silver manhood went as fast,
An iron age drew on at last;
'Tis vain its character to tell,
The several fates which it befell,
What year it died, when 'twill arise,
We only know that here it lies.

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