Henry David Thoreau

(12 July 1817 – 6 May 1862 / Concord, Massachusetts)

Henry David Thoreau Quotes

  • ''Say to the farmer: There is your crop; here is mine. Mine is a sugar to sweeten sugar with. If you will listen to me, I will sweeten your whole load,—your whole life.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, March 13, 1856, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 278, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Whatever beauty we behold, the more it is distant, serene, and cold, the purer and more durable it is. It is better to warm ourselves with ice than with fire.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, November 4, 1860, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 373, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''There is absolutely no common sense; it is common nonsense.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Paradise (To Be) Regained" (1843), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 298, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Think of our little eggshell of a canoe tossing across that great lake, a mere black speck to the eagle soaring above it!''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Allegash and East Branch" (1864) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 190, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Every man is entitled to come to Cattle-Show, even a transcendentalist; and for my part I am more interested in the men than in the cattle.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "The Succession of Forest Trees" (1860), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 184, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden, "Economy," (1854).
  • ''This phenomenon is more exhilarating to me than the luxuriance and fertility of vineyards.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 340, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''For the most part, we are not where we are, but in a false position. Through an infirmity of our natures, we suppose a case, and put ourselves into it, and hence are in two cases at the same time, and it is doubly difficult to get out.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 360, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''We cannot see anything until we are possessed with the idea of it, take it into our heads,—and then we can hardly see anything else.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Autumnal Tints" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 286, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''In our daily intercourse with men, our nobler faculties are dormant and suffered to rust. None will pay us the compliment to expect nobleness from us. Though we have gold to give, they demand only copper.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 284, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of Henry David Thoreau

Friendship

I think awhile of Love, and while I think,
Love is to me a world,
Sole meat and sweetest drink,
And close connecting link
Tween heaven and earth.

I only know it is, not how or why,
My greatest happiness;
However hard I try,
Not if I were to die,
Can I explain.

I fain would ask my friend how it can be,
But when the time arrives,
Then Love is more lovely
Than anything to me,
And so I'm dumb.

For if the truth were known, Love cannot speak,
But only thinks and does;
Though surely out 'twill leak
Without the help of...

Read the full of Friendship

I Am The Autumnal Sun

Sometimes a mortal feels in himself Nature
-- not his Father but his Mother stirs
within him, and he becomes immortal with her
immortality. From time to time she claims
kindredship with us, and some globule
from her veins steals up into our own.

I am the autumnal sun,
With autumn gales my race is run;

[Report Error]