Henry David Thoreau

(12 July 1817 – 6 May 1862 / Concord, Massachusetts)

Henry David Thoreau Quotes

  • ''So near along life's stream are the fountains of innocence and youth making fertile its sandy margin; and the voyageur will do well to replenish his vessels often at these uncontaminated sources.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 203, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
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  • ''He who eats the fruit should at least plant the seed; ay, if possible, a better seed than that whose fruit he has enjoyed.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 129, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Man needs to know but little more than a lobster in order to catch him in his traps.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Cape Cod (1855-1865), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 261, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Who shall describe the inexpressable tenderness and immortal life of the grim forest, where Nature, though it be midwinter, is ever in her spring, where the moss-grown and decaying trees are not old, but seem to enjoy a perpetual youth.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Ktaadn" (1848) in The Maine Woods (1864), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 89, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''We are superior to the joy we experience.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, December 22, 1853, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 225, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''It will always be found that one flourishing institution exists and battens on another mouldering one. The Present itself is parasitic to this extent.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, September 1, 1856, to Bronson Alcott, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 282, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Instead of noblemen, let us have noble villages of men.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 122, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''I aspire to be acquainted with wiser men than this our Concord soil has produced, whose names are hardly known here.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 119, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''How much more interesting an event is that man's supper who has just been forth in the snow to hunt, nay, you might say, steal, the fuel to cook it with! His bread and meat are sweet.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 275, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''I would fain keep sober always; and there are infinite degrees of drunkenness.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 240, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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Best Poem of Henry David Thoreau

Friendship

I think awhile of Love, and while I think,
Love is to me a world,
Sole meat and sweetest drink,
And close connecting link
Tween heaven and earth.

I only know it is, not how or why,
My greatest happiness;
However hard I try,
Not if I were to die,
Can I explain.

I fain would ask my friend how it can be,
But when the time arrives,
Then Love is more lovely
Than anything to me,
And so I'm dumb.

For if the truth were known, Love cannot speak,
But only thinks and does;
Though surely out 'twill leak
Without the help of...

Read the full of Friendship

Inspiration

Whate'er we leave to God, God does,
And blesses us;
The work we choose should be our own,
God leaves alone.

If with light head erect I sing,
Though all the Muses lend their force,
From my poor love of anything,
The verse is weak and shallow as its source.

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