Henry David Thoreau

(12 July 1817 – 6 May 1862 / Concord, Massachusetts)

Henry David Thoreau Quotes

  • ''I am sure that I never read any memorable news in a newspaper.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 104, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
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  • ''Our whole life is startingly moral. There is never an instant's truce between virtue and vice.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 241, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Every nail driven should be as another rivet in the machine of the universe, you carrying on the work.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Walden (1854), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 2, p. 364, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Politics are ... but as the cigar-smoke of a man.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Walking" (1862), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 5, p. 213, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Dreams are the touchstones of our characters.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 315, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Some interests have got a footing on the earth which we have not made sufficient allowance for.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 1, p. 129, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Absolutely speaking, the more money, the less virtue; for money comes between a man and his objects, and obtains them for him; and it was certainly no great virtue to obtain it.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. "Civil Disobedience," originally published as "Resistance to Civil Government" (1849), in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 4, p. 372, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''The mass never comes up to the standard of its best member, but on the contrary degrades itself to a level with the lowest.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Journals, entry for March 14, 1838 (1906).
  • ''It is surprising how contented one can be with nothing definite,—only a sense of existence. Well, anything for variety.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, December 6, 1856, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 294, Houghton Mifflin (1906).
  • ''Men cannot conceive of a state of things so fair that it cannot be realized.''
    Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862), U.S. philosopher, author, naturalist. Letter, March 27, 1848, to Harrison Blake, in The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 6, p. 162, Houghton Mifflin (1906).

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Best Poem of Henry David Thoreau

Friendship

I think awhile of Love, and while I think,
Love is to me a world,
Sole meat and sweetest drink,
And close connecting link
Tween heaven and earth.

I only know it is, not how or why,
My greatest happiness;
However hard I try,
Not if I were to die,
Can I explain.

I fain would ask my friend how it can be,
But when the time arrives,
Then Love is more lovely
Than anything to me,
And so I'm dumb.

For if the truth were known, Love cannot speak,
But only thinks and does;
Though surely out 'twill leak
Without the help of...

Read the full of Friendship

I Knew A Man By Sight

I knew a man by sight,
A blameless wight,
Who, for a year or more,
Had daily passed my door,
Yet converse none had had with him.

I met him in a lane,
Him and his cane,
About three miles from home,

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