Herman Melville

(1 August 1819 – 28 September 1891 / New York City, New York)

Herman Melville Quotes

  • ''Humanity cries out against this vast enormity:Mnot one man knows a prudent remedy. Blame not, then, the North; and wisely judge the South.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 162, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970). Spoken by Media, the king, about slavery.
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  • ''If a drunkard in a sober fit is the dullest of mortals, an enthusiast in a reason-fit is not the most lively.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 8, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984).
  • ''This country is at present engaged in furnishing material for future authors; not in encouraging its living ones.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Letter, July 20, 1851, to a publisher, Richard Bentley. Correspondence, vol. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, ed. Lynn Horth (1993). The subject was international copyright.
  • ''Toil is man's allotment; toil of brain, or toil of hands, or a grief that's more than either, the grief and sin of idleness.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 63, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).
  • ''St Louis, that city of outward-bound caravans for the West, and which is to the prairies, what Cairo is to the Desert.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. "Mr Parkman's Tour" (1849), The Piazza Tales and Other Prose Pieces 1839-1860, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 9, eds. Harrison Hayford, Alma A. MacDougall, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1987).
  • ''The grand points in human nature are the same to-day they were a thousand years ago. The only variability in them is in expression, not in feature.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. The Confidence-Man (1857), ch. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 10, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1984).
  • ''To you, ye stars, man owes his subtlest raptures, thoughts unspeakable, yet full of faith.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 58, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).
  • ''Nobody is so heartily despised as a pusillanimous, lazy, good-for-nothing, land-lubber; a sailor has no bowels of compassion for him.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Omoo (1846), ch. 14, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 2, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1968).
  • ''A thing may be incredible and still be true; sometimes it is incredible because it is true.''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Mardi (1849), ch. 97, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 3, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1970).
  • ''Say what they will of the glowing independence one feels in the saddle, give me the first morning flush of your cheery pedestrian!''
    Herman Melville (1819-1891), U.S. author. Omoo (1846), ch. 67, The Writings of Herman Melville, vol. 2, eds. Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle (1968).

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Best Poem of Herman Melville

Art

In placid hours well-pleased we dream
Of many a brave unbodied scheme.
But form to lend, pulsed life create,
What unlike things must meet and mate:
A flame to melt--a wind to freeze;
Sad patience--joyous energies;
Humility--yet pride and scorn;
Instinct and study; love and hate;
Audacity--reverence. These must mate,
And fuse with Jacob's mystic heart,
To wrestle with the angel--Art.

Read the full of Art

The Mound By The Lake

The grass shall never forget this grave.
When homeward footing it in the sun
After the weary ride by rail,
The stripling soldiers passed her door,
Wounded perchance, or wan and pale,
She left her household work undone -
Duly the wayside table spread,
With evergreens shaded, to regale
Each travel-spent and grateful one.

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