Honoré De Balzac


Honoré De Balzac Quotes

  • ''Music is of two kinds: one petty, poor, second-rate, never varying, its base the hundred or so phrasings which all musicians understand, a babbling which is more or less pleasant, the life that most composers live.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. In The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. IV, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971). Massimilla's observation, in Massimilla Doni.
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  • ''Society bristles with enigmas which look hard to solve. It is a perfect maze of intrigue.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mlle. De Chaulieu in a letter to Mme de l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).
  • ''A husband who submits to his wife's yoke is justly held an object of ridicule. A woman's influence ought to be entirely concealed.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. de l'Estorade in a letter to Mlle. De Chaulieu, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).
  • ''Excess of joy is harder to bear than any amount of sorrow.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. de l'Estorade in a letter to Mme. De Macumer, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).
  • ''The passion of love is essentially selfish, while motherhood widens the circle of our feelings.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).
  • ''Children, dear and loving children, can alone console a woman for the loss of her beauty.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Mme. Gaston in a letter to Mme. De l'Estorade, in Letters of Two Brides (Mémoires de Deux Jeunes Mariées), in La Presse (1841-1842), Souverain (1842), included in the Scènes de la Vie Privée in the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971).
  • ''For passion, be it observed, brings insight with it; it can give a sort of intelligence to simpletons, fools, and idiots, especially during youth.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.
  • ''A widow has two duties of a contradictory nature—she is a mother, and she ought to exert a father's power.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, the first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.
  • ''A grocer is attracted to his business by a magnetic force as great as the repulsion which renders it odious to artists.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabouill.
  • ''It would be curious to know what leads a man to become a stationer rather than a baker, when he is no longer compelled, as among the Egyptians, to succeed to his father's craft.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in A Bachelor's Establishment, originally named Les Célibataires, first part was published as Les Deux Frères in La Presse (1841); included in the Comédie humaine first under the title Un Ménage de Garìon and finally as La Rabo.

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