Honoré De Balzac


Honoré De Balzac Quotes

  • ''The habits of life form the soul, and the soul forms the countenance.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in The Abbé Birotteau, appeared in the Comédie humaine as Le Curé de Tours (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in the Scènes de la Vie Privée (1832), Les Célibataires; later appeared in Vie de Province.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Love or hatred must constantly increase between two persons who are always together; every moment fresh reasons are found for loving or hating better.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in The Abbé Birotteau, appeared in the Comédie humaine as Le Curé de Tours (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in Scènes la Vie Privée (1832) as Les Célibataires; later appeared in Vie de Province.
  • ''Unintelligent persons are like weeds that thrive in good ground; they love to be amused in proportion to the degree in which they weary themselves.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in The Abbé Birotteau, appeared in the Comédie humaine as Le Curé de Tours (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in Scènes la Vie Privée (1832) as Les Célibataires; later appeared in Vie de Province.
  • ''Old maids, having never bent their temper or their lives to other lives and other tempers, as woman's destiny requires, have for the most part a mania for making everything about them bend to them.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Narrator, in The Abbé Birotteau, appeared in the Comédie humaine as Le Curé de Tours (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971), also appeared in the Scènes de la Vie Privée (1832) as Les Célibataires; later appeared in Vie de Province.
  • ''The winter is to a woman of fashion what, of yore, a campaign was to the soldiers of the Empire.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. In The Works of Honoré de Balzac, vol. IV, trans. by George Saintsbury (1971). Narrator, in The Imaginary Mistress, original title La fausse maötresse, in Le Siècle (December, 1831).
  • ''There is something great and terrible about suicide.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).
  • ''Between the daylight gambler and the player at night there is the same difference that lies between a careless husband and the lover swooning under his lady's window.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Later appeared as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), and part of the Etudes philosophiques (1831). It then entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator, in The Wild Ass's Skin (La Peau de chagrin), which was first published by Gosselin (1831).
  • ''Remorse is impotence; it will sin again. Only repentance is strong; it can end everything.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. It later entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator's description of Wilfred, in Seraphita, chapter III, First published as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), then the Etudes philosophiques (1835).
  • ''The truest splendors are not in outward things, but in ourselves.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. It later entered the Comédie humaine (1845, trans. by George Saintsbury, 1971). Narrator's observation, in Seraphita, chapter III, First published as part of Romans et contes philosophiques (1831), then the Etudes philosophiques (1835).
  • ''Manners are the hypocrisy of a nation.''
    Honoré De Balzac (1799-1850), French novelist. Quoted in André Gide, Journals 1889-1949, entry for 1911, ed. Justin O'Brien (1951).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]