Horace Walpole

[4th Earl of Orford] (1717-1797 / London)

Horace Walpole Quotes

  • ''Cunning is neither the consequence of sense, nor does it give sense. A proof that it is not sense, is that cunning people never imagine that others can see through them. It is the consequence of weakness.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 23, ed. by Lars E. Troide, copyright Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1786.
    2 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''The passions seldom give good advice but to the interested and mercenary. Resentment generally suggests bad measures. Second thoughts and good nature will rarely, very rarely, approve the first hints of anger.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 62, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • ''If Paris lived now, and preferred beauty to power and riches, it would not be called his Judgment, but his Want of Judgment.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 60, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787; in Greek mythology, the Judgment of Paris is the story of Paris's awarding the prize of beauty to the Goddess Aphrodite (over the Goddesses Hera and Pallas Athena) in return for the bribe of the fairest woman in the world, Helen.
  • ''We often repent of our first thoughts, and scarce ever of our second.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 62, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • ''Our [British] summers are often, though beautiful for verdure, so cold, that they are rather cold winters.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 52, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • ''Lord Bath used to say of women, who are apt to say that they will follow their own judgment, that they could not follow a worse guide.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 69, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1788; William Pulteney (1684-1764), Earl of Bath, statesman, reflects his age's suspicion of women's understanding.
  • ''A poet who makes use of a worse word instead of a better, because the former fits the rhyme or the measure, though it weakens the sense, is like a jeweller, who cuts a diamond into a brilliant, and diminishes the weight to make it shine more.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 20, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1786.
  • ''[The] taste [of the French] is too timid to be true taste—or is but half taste.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 57, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1787.
  • ''By deafness one gains in one respect more than one loses; one misses more nonsense than sense.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 68, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1788.
  • ''They who feel cannot keep their minds in the equilibrium of a pair of scales: fear and hope have no equiponderant weights.''
    Horace Walpole (1717-1797), British author. Horace Walpole's Miscellany 1786-1795, p. 33, ed. Lars E. Troide, Yale University Press (1978). Originally written in 1786.

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]