James Fenimore Cooper

((1789-1851) / Burlington, New Jersey, United States)

James Fenimore Cooper Quotes

  • ''Individuality is the aim of political liberty. By leaving to the citizen as much freedom of action and of being, as comports with order and the rights of others, the institutions render him truly a freeman. He is left to pursue his means of happiness in his own manner.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "Individuality," The American Democrat (1838).
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  • ''The very existence of government at all, infers inequality. The citizen who is preferred to office becomes the superior to those who are not, so long as he is the repository of power, and the child inherits the wealth of the parent as a controlling law of society.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On American Equality," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''The Americans ... are almost ignorant of the art of music, one of the most elevating, innocent and refining of human tastes, whose influence on the habits and morals of a people is of the most beneficial tendency.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On Civilization," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''The American doctrinaire is the converse of the American demagogue, and, in this way, is scarcely less injurious to the public. The first deals in poetry, the last in cant. He is as much a visionary on one side, as the extreme theoretical democrat is a visionary on the other.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On Demagogues," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On Deportment," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''America owes most of its social prejudices to the exaggerated religious opinions of the different sects which were so instrumental in establishing the colonies.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On Prejudice," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''Equality, in a social sense, may be divided into that of condition and that of rights. Equality of condition is incompatible with civilization, and is found only to exist in those communities that are but slightly removed from the savage state. In practice, it can only mean a common misery.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On the Disadvantages of a Monarchy," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''A monarchy is the most expensive of all forms of government, the regal state requiring a costly parade, and he who depends on his own power to rule, must strengthen that power by bribing the active and enterprising whom he cannot intimidate.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On the Disadvantages of a Monarchy," The American Democrat (1838).
  • ''It is a misfortune that necessity has induced men to accord greater license to this formidable engine, in order to obtain liberty, than can be borne with less important objects in view; for the press, like fire, is an excellent servant, but a terrible master.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. "On the Press," The American Democrat.
  • ''The common faults of American language are an ambition of effect, a want of simplicity, and a turgid abuse of terms.''
    James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), U.S. novelist. The American Democrat, "On Language," (1838).

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Best Poem of James Fenimore Cooper

My Brigantine

MY brigantine!
Just in thy mould and beauteous in thy form,
Gentle in roll and buoyant on the surge,
Light as the sea-fowl rocking in the storm,
In breeze and gale thy onward course we urge,
My water-queen!

Lady of mine!
More light and swift than thou none thread the sea,
With surer keel or steadier on its path;
We brave each waste of ocean-mystery
And laugh to hear the howling tempest's wrath,
For we are thine!

My brigantine!
Trust to the mystic power that points thy way,
Trust to...

Read the full of My Brigantine

My Brigantine

MY brigantine!
Just in thy mould and beauteous in thy form,
Gentle in roll and buoyant on the surge,
Light as the sea-fowl rocking in the storm,
In breeze and gale thy onward course we urge,
My water-queen!

Lady of mine!
More light and swift than thou none thread the sea,

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