James Joyce

(2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941 / Dublin / Ireland)

James Joyce Quotes

  • ''He affirmed his significance as a conscious rational animal proceeding syllogistically from the known to the unknown and a conscious rational reagent between a micro and macrocosm ineluctably constructed upon the incertitude of the void.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 17, "Ithaca," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). The best Stephen Dedalus can do in modernist terms on the subject of perfectibility in the catechism section of Ulysses.
    2 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''There is no heresy or no philosophy which is so abhorrent to the church as a human being.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. letter, Nov. 22, 1902, in which Joyce declared his intention of leaving Ireland for good; an inaccurate text, taken from a typescript of this letter, is printed in Letters of James Joyce, vol. 1 (1957). From a private collection.
  • ''When the soul of man is born in this country there are nets flung at it to hold it back from flight. You talk to me of nationality, language, religion. I shall try to fly by those nets.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, ch. 5. Stephen Dedalus speaks of his relation to Ireland, but the preposition "by" holds a double meaning for the flight-inspired Daedalian artist: both beyond and by means of.
  • ''MUpon my word it makes my blood boil to hear anyone compare Aristotle with Plato. MWhich of the two, Stephen asked, would have banished me from his commonwealth?''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 9, "Scylla and Charybdis," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus questions John Eglinton in the "Library" chapter of Ulysses.
  • ''He found in the world without as actual what was in his world within as possible.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 9, "Scylla and Charybdis," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus on Shakespeare.
  • ''Where there is a reconciliation, Stephen said, there must have been first a sundering.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 9, "Scylla and Charybdis," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus on one of the basic plots of literature.
  • ''We are an unfortunate priestridden race and always were and always will be till the end of the chapter.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, ch. 1. Simon Dedalus speaks of Ireland at the family Christmas dinner.
  • ''Think you're escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 13, "Nausicaa," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Leopold Bloom on the basic Joycean plot.
  • ''A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 9, "Scylla and Charybdis," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus on Shakespeare and genius.
  • ''History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake.''
    James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish author. Ulysses, ch. 2, "Nestor," The Corrected Text, ed. Hans Walter Gabler, Random House (1986). Stephen Dedalus's response to the slogan-mongering Mr. Deasy, his schoolmaster employer.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of James Joyce

All Day I Hear The Noise Of Waters

All day I hear the noise of waters
Making moan,
Sad as the sea-bird is when, going
Forth alone,
He hears the winds cry to the water's
Monotone.

The grey winds, the cold winds are blowing
Where I go.
I hear the noise of many waters
Far below.
All day, all night, I hear them flowing
To and fro.

Read the full of All Day I Hear The Noise Of Waters

From Dewy Dreams

From dewy dreams, my soul, arise,
From love's deep slumber and from death,
For lo! the treees are full of sighs
Whose leaves the morn admonisheth.

Eastward the gradual dawn prevails
Where softly-burning fires appear,
Making to tremble all those veils
Of grey and golden gossamer.

[Report Error]