James Madison


James Madison Quotes

  • ''Testimony of all ages forces us to admit that war is among the most dangerous enemies to liberty, and that the executive is the branch most favored by it of all the branches of Power.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Political Reflections" (February 23, 1799). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 241, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
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  • ''[Religious liberty was] in its nature an inalienable right ... because the opinions of men, depending only upon the evidence contemplated by their minds, cannot follow the dictates of other men.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessment" (1785). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 8, p. 299, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''As a man is said to have a right to his property, he may equally be said to have a property in his rights.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Property" (March 29, 1792). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 266, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''The proposed Constitution ... is, in strictness, neither a national nor a federal constitution; but a composition of both.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Federalist Papers (Jan. 1788), no. 39, The Federalist, ed. Benjamin F. Wright (1961).
  • ''The diversity in the faculties of men, from which the rights of property originate, is not less an insuperable obstacle to a uniformity of interests. The protection of these faculties is the first object of government.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. Democratic-Republican politician, president. Federalist Papers, Nov. 1787, no. 10, The Federalist, ed. Benjamin F. Wright (1961).
  • ''The powers of the federal government ... result from the compact to which the states are parties, [and are] limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Virginia Resolves of 1798. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 17, p. 189, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''A sincere and steadfast co-operation in promoting such a reconstruction of our political system as would provide for the permanent liberty and happiness of the United States.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to George Tucker, June 27, 1836. Madison Papers, Library of Congress. On his fifty-year friendship with Thomas Jefferson.
  • ''[Let] the Union of the States be cherished and perpetuated. Let the open enemy to it be regarded as a Pandora with her box opened; and the disguised one, as the Serpent creeping with his deadly wiles into paradise.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Advice to My Country" (1834). Madison Papers, Library of Congress.
  • ''The capacity of the female mind for studies of the highest order cannot be doubted, having been sufficiently illustrated by its works of genius, of erudition, and of science.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Albert Picket, September 1821. Madison Papers, Library of Congress.
  • ''[T]he temple through which alone lies the road to that of Liberty.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Jefferson, February 24, 1826. Madison Papers, Library of Congress. Speaking of universities.

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