James Madison


James Madison Quotes

  • ''As long as the reason of man continues fallible, and he is at liberty to exercise it, different opinions will be formed.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 78, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 10 (November 22, 1787).
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  • ''In the extent and proper structure of the Union, therefore, we behold a republican remedy for the diseases most incident to republican government.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 84, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 10 (November 22, 1787).
  • ''The internal effects of a mutable policy ... poisons the blessings of liberty itself.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 381, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 57 (February 19, 1788).
  • ''Had every Athenian citizen been a Socrates, every Athenian assembly would still have been a mob.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 342, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 55 (February 13, 1788). Referring to the need for small legislative bodies.
  • ''Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty as well as by the abuses of power.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 330, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 53 (February 9, 1788).
  • ''The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 79, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 10 (November 22, 1787).
  • ''What is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature?''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 322, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 51 (February 6, 1788).
  • ''Every nation ... whose affairs betray a want of wisdom and stability may calculate on every loss which can be sustained from the more systematic policy of its wiser neighbors.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. The Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay, p. 381, ed. Clinton Rossiter, New York (1961). The Federalist, No. 62 (February 27, 1788).
  • ''Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 437, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).
  • ''The rights of persons, and the rights of property, are the objects, for the protection of which Government was instituted.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at the Virginia Convention, 1829. The Mind of the Founder: Sources of the Political Thought of James Madison, p. 512, ed. Marvin Meyers, Indianapolis (1973).

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