James Madison


James Madison Quotes

  • ''The people shall not be deprived or abridged of their right to speak, write, or to publish their sentiments; and the freedom of the press, as one of the great bulwarks of liberty, shall be inviolable.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. First draft of what became the First Amendment, June 8, 1789. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 12, p. 201, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
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  • ''Pray for the Liberty of the Conscience to revive among us.... Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprize, every expanded prospect.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to William Bradford, April 1, 1794. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 1, p. 113, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''Let me recommend the best medicine in the world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant country, in easy stages.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Horatio Gates, February 28, 1794. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 15, p. 164, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''A man has a property in his opinions and the free communication of them.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. "Property" (March 29, 1792). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 266, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''I flatter myself [we] have in this country extinguished forever the ambitious hope of making laws for the human mind.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Thomas Jefferson, January 22, 1786. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 8, p. 474, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991). After the defeat of the Religious Assessment in Virginia.
  • ''By rendering the labor of one, the property of the other, they cherish pride, luxury, and vanity on one side; on the other, vice and servility, or hatred and revolt.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. National Gazette (December 19, 1791). W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 14, p. 164, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991). Comparing slavery to colonies.
  • ''To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at the Virginia Convention, June 20, 1788. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 11, p. 163, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''The Civil rights of none shall be abridged on account of religious belief or worship, nor shall any national religion be established, nor shall the full and equal rights of conscience be in any manner, or on any pretext, be infringed.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. First draft of what became the First Amendment, June 8, 1789. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 12, p. 201, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''I have no doubt but that the misery of the lower classes will be found to abate whenever the Government assumes a freer aspect and the laws favor a subdivision of Property.''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Madison to Jefferson, June 19, 1786. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 9, p. 76, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).
  • ''I go by the great republican principle, that the people will have the virtue and intelligence to select men of virtue and wisdom [to the offices of government].''
    James Madison (1751-1836), U.S. president. Speech at the Virginia Convention, June 20, 1788. W.T. Hutchinson et al., The Papers of James Madison, vol. 11, p. 163, Chicago and Charlottesville, Virginia (1962-1991).

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