Jane Austen

(16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817 / Hampshire, England)

Jane Austen Quotes

  • ''The ladies here probably exchanged looks which meant, "Men never know when things are dirty or not;" and the gentlemen perhaps thought each to himself, "Women will have their little nonsense and needless cares."''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 29 (1816).
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  • ''Goldsmith tells us, that when lovely woman stoops to folly, she has nothing to do but to die; and when she stoops to be disagreeable, it is equally to be recommended as a clearer of ill-fame.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 45 (1816).
  • ''Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Emma, ch. 49 (1816).
  • ''What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. letter, Sept. 18, 1796.
  • ''One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne Elliot, in Persuasion, ch. 20 (1818).
  • ''The trees, though not fully clothed, were in that delightful state, when further beauty is known to be at hand, and when, while much is actually given to the sight, more yet remains for the imagination.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 46 (1814).
  • ''It was the misfortune of poetry, to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly, were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne Elliot's thought, in Persuasion, ch. 8 (1818).
  • ''Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore every body, not greatly in fault themselves, to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 48 (1814).
  • ''My idea of good company ... is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Anne, in Persuasion, ch. 16 (1818). Mr. Elliot replies, "that is not good company; that is the best."
  • ''Let no one presume to give the feelings of a young woman on receiving the assurance of that affection of which she has scarcely allowed herself to entertain a hope.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Mansfield Park, ch. 48 (1814).

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Best Poem of Jane Austen

I'Ve A Pain In My Head

'I've a pain in my head'
Said the suffering Beckford;
To her Doctor so dread.
'Oh! what shall I take for't?'

Said this Doctor so dread
Whose name it was Newnham.
'For this pain in your head
Ah! What can you do Ma'am?'

Said Miss Beckford, 'Suppose
If you think there's no risk,
I take a good Dose
Of calomel brisk.'--

'What a praise worthy Notion.'
Replied Mr. Newnham.
'You shall have such a potion
And so will I too Ma'am.'

Read the full of I'Ve A Pain In My Head

Ode To Pity

1

Ever musing I delight to tread
The Paths of honour and the Myrtle Grove
Whilst the pale Moon her beams doth shed
On disappointed Love.
While Philomel on airy hawthorn Bush
Sings sweet and Melancholy, And the thrush
Converses with the Dove.

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