Jane Austen

(16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817 / Hampshire, England)

Jane Austen Quotes

  • ''A mind lively and at ease, can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 27 (1816).
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  • ''When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's comfort.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 24 (1818).
  • ''There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 31 (1816).
  • ''Husbands and wives generally understand when opposition will be vain.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 7 (1818).
  • ''A single woman, with a very narrow income, must be a ridiculous, disagreeable, old maid! the proper sport of boys and girls; but a single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as anybody else.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 10 (1816).
  • ''It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. A man always imagines a woman to be ready for anybody who asks her.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma in Emma, ch. 8 (1816).
  • ''How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 2 (1818).
  • ''There are people, the more you do for them, the less they do for themselves.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma's thought, in Emma, ch. 11 (1816).
  • ''The public ... is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. The narrator, in Persuasion, ch. 1 (1818).
  • ''General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be.''
    Jane Austen (1775-1817), British novelist. Emma's thought, in Emma, ch. 37 (1816).

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Best Poem of Jane Austen

This Little Bag

This little bag I hope will prove
To be not vainly made--
For, if you should a needle want
It will afford you aid.
And as we are about to part
T'will serve another end,
For when you look upon the Bag
You'll recollect your friend

Read the full of This Little Bag

Ode To Pity

1

Ever musing I delight to tread
The Paths of honour and the Myrtle Grove
Whilst the pale Moon her beams doth shed
On disappointed Love.
While Philomel on airy hawthorn Bush
Sings sweet and Melancholy, And the thrush
Converses with the Dove.

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