Jane Grey Swisshelm


Jane Grey Swisshelm Quotes

  • ''Let the erring sisters depart in peace; the idea of getting up a civil war to compel the weaker States to remain in the Union appears to us horrible to the last degree.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. article, St. Cloud Democrat (November 11, 1860).
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  • ''It appears to be a matter of national pride that the President is to have more mud, and blacker mud, and filthier mud in front of his door than any other man can afford.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. article, St. Cloud Democrat (September 24, 1863). Report on conditions in Washington.
  • ''Dying is not difficult, yielding is impossible.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Crusader and Feminist: Letters of Jane Grey Swisshelm 1858-1865, p. 10, ed. Arthur J. Larsen, Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul (1934). Editorial written after vigilante attack on her newspaper office.
  • ''So, instead of spending my strength quarreling with the hand, I would strike for the heart of that great tyranny.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 102, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880). On her decision to fight for a woman's right to keep her own money.
  • ''Women should not weaken their cause by impracticable demands. Make no claim which could not be won in a reasonable time. Take one step at a time, get a good foothold in it and advance carefully.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 143-44, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880). On women's rights.
  • ''It was quite an insignificant looking sheet, but no sooner did the American eagle catch sight of it, than he swooned and fell off his perch.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Taking Their Place: A Documentary History of Women and Journalism. Half A Century, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880). On male reaction to a woman as editor.
  • ''It is an old adage, "All is fair in love as in war," but I thought not of general laws, and only felt a private grievance.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 42, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880). On her husband's domination.
  • ''Their holders have always seemed to me like a woman who should undertake at a state fair to run a sewing machine, under pretense of advertising it, while she had never spent an hour in learning its use.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. newspaperwoman, abolitionist, and human rights activist. Half a Century, ch. 29 (1880). Swisshelm, formerly an abolitionist and defender of human rights, had attended five women's rights conventions; it was of these, which she thought were amateurishly run, that she was speaking.
  • ''Abolitionists were men of sharp angles. Organizing them was like binding crooked sticks in a bundle.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. newspaperwoman, abolitionist, and human rights activist. Half a Century, ch. 18 (1880). On writing for The Spirit of Liberty, an abolitionist publication, in the early 1840s. Later, in 1847, Swisshelm founded her own abolitionist paper, the Pittsburg Saturday Visitor.
  • ''Nothing could add to the shudder of going into the house, and she seemed so grieved and frightened that my heart was touched, and I was sorry for her that we had ever met.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 87, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880).

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