Jane Grey Swisshelm


Jane Grey Swisshelm Quotes

  • ''It will open a door through which fools and fanatics will pour in, and make the cause ridiculous.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. newspaperwoman, abolitionist, and human rights activist. Half a Century, ch. 29 (1880). Explaining why she was declining the presidency of a planned women's rights convention.
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  • ''When a woman starts out in the world on a mission, secular or religious, she should leave her feminine charms at home.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. newspaperwoman, abolitionist, and human rights activist. Half a Century, ch. 21 (1880).
  • ''I put away my brushes; resolutely crucified my divine gift, and while it hung writhing on the cross, spent my best years and powers cooking cabbage. "A servant of servants shall she be," must have been spoken of women, not Negroes.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm, U.S. newspaperwoman, abolitionist, and human rights activist. Half a Century, ch. 8 (1880). On giving up her artistic work to keep house for her husband. Later, she would become a journalist and the founder of an abolitionist newspaper, the Pittsburg Saturday Visiter.
  • ''I had lived over twenty years without the legal right to be alone one hour M to have the exclusive use of one foot of space M to receive an unopened letter, or to preserve a line of manuscript "from sharp and sly inspection."''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 164, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880).
  • ''Had I made capital on my prettiness, I should have closed the doors of public employment to women for many a year, by the very means which now makes them weak, underpaid competitors in the great workshop of the world.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. newspaperwoman, abolitionist, and human rights activist. Half a Century, ch. 21 (1880). On her founding of the abolitionist newspaper, the Pittsburg Saturday Visiter.
  • ''I must be the mate of the man I had chosen; and if he would not come to my level, I must go to his.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, p. 50, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880).
  • ''A woman with her two children was captured on the steps of the capitol building, whither she had fled for protection, and this, too, while the stars and stripes floated over it.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Half A Century, pp. 148-49, Jansen, McClurg and Company, Chicago (1880). On Washington slave trade.
  • ''I cannot tell what I am as much afraid of, as a woman who invariably washes on Monday. It is a kind of key to character; and if her mouth is not puckered and her brow wrinkled, they will be, unless she repents.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Letters to Country Girls, p. 39, John C. Riker, New York (1853).
  • ''They plough, harrow, reap, dig, make hay, rake, bind grain, thresh, chop wood, milk, churn, do anything that is hard work, physical labor, and who says anything against it?''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. journalist, author, crusader. Letters To Country Girls, p. 78, John C. Riker, New York (1853).
  • ''We have not the slightest idea that women are made of such light material that the breath of any fool or knave may blow them on the rocks of ruin.''
    Jane Grey Swisshelm (1815-1884), U.S. newspaper editor, abolitionist, temperance and women's rights activist. The Lily, p. 3 (January 1850). The first feminist journal in the United States, the magazine was edited by Amelia Jenks Bloomer (1818-1894) in Seneca Falls, N.Y, for the majority of its 1849-1858 run.

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