Jean De La Fontaine

(1621 - 1695 / Champagne / France)

Jean De La Fontaine Poems

1. The Three Gossips' Wager 1/1/2004
2. The Pack-Saddle 1/1/2004
3. The Progress Of Wit 1/1/2004
4. The Servant Girl Justified 1/1/2004
5. The Picture 1/1/2004
6. The Pitcher 1/1/2004
7. The Dress-Maker 1/1/2004
8. The Hermit 1/1/2004
9. The Princess Betrothed To The King Of Garba 1/1/2004
10. The Glutton 1/1/2004
11. The Muleteer 1/1/2004
12. The Devil In Hell 1/1/2004
13. The Truckers 1/1/2004
14. The Quid Pro Quo; Or The Mistakes 1/1/2004
15. The Spectacles 1/1/2004
16. The Psalter 1/1/2004
17. The River Scamander 1/1/2004
18. The Indiscreet Confessions 1/1/2004
19. The Old Man's Calendar 1/1/2004
20. The Nightingale 1/1/2004
21. The Sick Abbess 1/1/2004
22. To Promise Is One Thing To Keep It, Another 1/1/2004
23. The Ear-Maker And The Mould-Mender 1/1/2004
24. The Magnificent 1/1/2004
25. The Falcon 1/1/2004
26. The Rhemese 1/1/2004
27. The Gascon Punished 1/1/2004
28. The Monks Of Catalonia 1/1/2004
29. The Impossible Thing 1/1/2004
30. The Bucking-Tub 1/1/2004
31. The Kiss Returned 1/1/2004
32. The Eel Pie 1/1/2004
33. The Two Friends 1/1/2004
34. The Dog 1/1/2004
35. The Convent Gardener Of Lamporechio 1/1/2004
36. The Little Bell 1/1/2004
37. The Mandrake 1/1/2004
38. The Gascon 1/1/2004
39. The Cradle 1/1/2004
40. The Magic Cup 1/1/2004

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Best Poem of Jean De La Fontaine

Belphegor Addressed To Miss De Chammelay

YOUR name with ev'ry pleasure here I place,
The last effusions of my muse to grace.
O charming Phillis! may the same extend
Through time's dark night: our praise together blend;
To this we surely may pretend to aim
Your acting and my rhymes attention claim.
Long, long in mem'ry's page your fame shall live;
You, who such ecstacy so often give;
O'er minds, o'er hearts triumphantly you reign:
In Berenice, in Phaedra, and Chimene,
Your tears and plaintive accents all engage:
Beyond compare in proud Camilla's rage;
Your voice and manner auditors delight;
Who ...

Read the full of Belphegor Addressed To Miss De Chammelay

The Cobbler

WE'RE told, that once a cobbler, BLASE by name;
A wife had got, whose charms so high in fame;
But as it happened, that their cash was spent,
The honest couple to a neighbour went,
A corn-factor by trade, not overwise
To whom they stated facts without disguise;
And begged, with falt'ring voice denoting care,
That he, of wheat, would half a measure spare,
Upon their note, which readily he gave,

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