Jean De La Fontaine

(1621 - 1695 / Champagne / France)

Jean De La Fontaine Poems

1. The Three Gossips' Wager 1/1/2004
2. The Pack-Saddle 1/1/2004
3. The Princess Betrothed To The King Of Garba 1/1/2004
4. The Progress Of Wit 1/1/2004
5. The Servant Girl Justified 1/1/2004
6. The Pitcher 1/1/2004
7. The Dress-Maker 1/1/2004
8. The Hermit 1/1/2004
9. The Picture 1/1/2004
10. The Glutton 1/1/2004
11. The Muleteer 1/1/2004
12. The Devil In Hell 1/1/2004
13. The Truckers 1/1/2004
14. The Quid Pro Quo; Or The Mistakes 1/1/2004
15. The Spectacles 1/1/2004
16. The Psalter 1/1/2004
17. The River Scamander 1/1/2004
18. The Indiscreet Confessions 1/1/2004
19. The Old Man's Calendar 1/1/2004
20. The Nightingale 1/1/2004
21. The Sick Abbess 1/1/2004
22. To Promise Is One Thing To Keep It, Another 1/1/2004
23. The Ear-Maker And The Mould-Mender 1/1/2004
24. The Magnificent 1/1/2004
25. The Falcon 1/1/2004
26. The Rhemese 1/1/2004
27. The Gascon Punished 1/1/2004
28. The Monks Of Catalonia 1/1/2004
29. The Impossible Thing 1/1/2004
30. The Kiss Returned 1/1/2004
31. The Bucking-Tub 1/1/2004
32. The Eel Pie 1/1/2004
33. The Two Friends 1/1/2004
34. The Dog 1/1/2004
35. The Convent Gardener Of Lamporechio 1/1/2004
36. The Little Bell 1/1/2004
37. The Mandrake 1/1/2004
38. The Gascon 1/1/2004
39. The Cradle 1/1/2004
40. The Magic Cup 1/1/2004

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Best Poem of Jean De La Fontaine

The Country Justice

TWO lawyers to their cause so well adhered,
A country justice quite confused appeared,
By them the facts were rendered so obscure
With which the truth remained he was not sure.
At length, completely tired, two straws he sought
Of diff'rent lengths, and to the parties brought.
These in his hand he held:--the plaintiff drew
(So fate decreed) the shortest of the two.
On this the other homeward took his way,
To boast how nicely he had gained the day.

THE bench complained: the magistrate replied
Don't blame I pray--'tis nothing new I've tried;
Courts often ...

Read the full of The Country Justice

The Clyster

IF truth give pleasure, surely we should try;
To found our tales on what we can rely;
Th' experiment repeatedly I've made,
And seen how much realities persuade:
They draw attention: confidence awake;
Fictitious names however we should take,
And then the rest detail without disguise:
'Tis thus I mean to manage my supplies.

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