Joan Didion


Joan Didion Quotes

  • ''Americans are uneasy with their possessions, guilty about power, all of which is difficult for Europeans to perceive because they are themselves so truly materialistic, so versed in the uses of power.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. "7000 Romaine, Los Angeles," Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1967, repr. 1968).
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  • ''The fancy that extraterrestrial life is by definition of a higher order than our own is one that soothes all children, and many writers.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. "Doris Lessing," The White Album (1979).
  • ''It is often said that New York is a city for only the very rich and the very poor. It is less often said that New York is also, at least for those of us who came there from somewhere else, a city for only the very young.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. (First published 1967). "Goodbye to All That," Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968).
  • ''A pool is, for many of us in the West, a symbol not of affluence but of order, of control over the uncontrollable. A pool is water, made available and useful, and is, as such, infinitely soothing to the western eye.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. "Holy Water," The White Album (first published 1977, repr. 1979).
  • ''The apparent ease of California life is an illusion, and those who believe the illusion will live here in only the most temporary way.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1935), U.S. essayist. (First published 1977). "Holy Water," The White Album (1979).
  • ''A place belongs forever to whoever claims it hardest, remembers it most obsessively, wrenches it from itself, shapes it, renders it, loves it so radically that he remakes it in his own image.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. "In the Islands," The White Album (1979).
  • ''Of course great hotels have always been social ideas, flawless mirrors to the particular societies they service.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1935), U.S. essayist. "In the Islands," The White Album (1979).
  • ''New York is full of people ... with a feeling for the tangential adventure, the risky adventure, the interlude that's not likely to end in any double-ring ceremony.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. Mademoiselle (New York, Feb. 1961).
  • ''To have that sense of one's intrinsic worth which constitutes self-respect is potentially to have everything: the ability to discriminate, to love and to remain indifferent. To lack it is to be locked within oneself, paradoxically incapable of either love or indifference.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. "On Self-Respect," Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968).
  • ''Writers are always selling somebody out.''
    Joan Didion (b. 1934), U.S. essayist. Slouching Towards Bethlehem, preface (1968).

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