John Donne

(24 January 1572 - 31 March 1631 / London, England)

John Donne Quotes

  • ''To be no part of any body, is to be nothing.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. letter, Sept. 1608, to Sir Henry Goodyer. Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929).
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  • ''When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624).
    189 person liked.
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  • ''No man is an island entire of itself; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.... Any man's death diminishes me because I am involved in Mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 17 (1624). "To be no part of any body, is to be nothing." (letter, Sept. 1608, to Sir Henry Goodyer, published in Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward, 1929).
    234 person liked.
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  • ''But I do nothing upon myself, and yet am mine own executioner.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). Devotions upon Emergent Occasions, meditation 12 (1624).
    115 person liked.
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  • ''Humiliation is the beginning of sanctification.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Eighty Sermons, sermon 7 (1640).
    119 person liked.
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  • ''Affliction is a treasure, and scarce any man hath enough of it.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. "Meditation 17," Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (1624).
    10 person liked.
    10 person did not like.
  • ''When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Meditation 17, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions (1624).
    13 person liked.
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  • ''Man is not only a contributory creature, but a total creature; he does not only make one, but he is all; he is not a piece of the world, but the world itself; and next to the glory of God, the reason why there is a world.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. Sermons, no. 35 (1625).
    12 person liked.
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  • ''Wicked is not much worse than indiscreet.''
    John Donne (c. 1572-1631), British divine, metaphysical poet. repr. In Complete Poetry and Selected Prose, ed. John Hayward (1929). An Anatomy of the World: First Anniversary (1611).
    11 person liked.
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Best Poem of John Donne

For Whom The Bell Tolls

PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he
knows not it tolls for him; and perchance I may think myself so
much better than I am, as that they who are about me, and see my
state, may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that. The
church is Catholic, universal, so are all her actions; all that she
does belongs to all. When she baptizes a child, that action
concerns me; for that child is thereby connected to that body which
is my head too, and ingrafted into that body whereof I am a member.
...

Read the full of For Whom The Bell Tolls

The Ecstasy

Where, like a pillow on a bed
A pregnant bank swell'd up to rest
The violet's reclining head,
Sat we two, one another's best.
Our hands were firmly cemented
With a fast balm, which thence did spring;
Our eye-beams twisted, and did thread
Our eyes upon one double string;
So to'intergraft our hands, as yet

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