John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

John Keats
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John Keats was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of romantic poets along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his work only having been in publication for four years before his death.

Although his poems were not generally well received by critics during his life, his reputation grew after his death, so that by the end of the 19th century he had become one of the most beloved of all English poets. He had a significant influence on a diverse range of later poets and writers. Jorge Luis Borges stated that his first encounter with Keats was the most significant literary experience of his life.

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Quotations

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  • ''Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own works.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Oct. 9, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 90, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Despite Shelley's assertion ...
  • I have been astonished that men could die martyrs for religion—I have shuddered at it. I shudder no more—I could be martyred for my religion—Love is my religion—I could die for tha...
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Oct. 13, 1819, to his fiancée Fanny Brawne. Letters of John Keats, no. 160, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • ''Do you not see how necessary a world of pains and troubles is to school an intelligence and make it a soul?''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats...
  • ''It appears to me that almost any man may like the spider spin from his own inwards his own airy citadel.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 19, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 48, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • ''You speak of Lord Byron and me—there is this great difference between us. He describes what he sees—I describe what I imagine. Mine is the hardest task.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Sept. 17-27, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law George and Georgiana Keats. The Letters of John Keat...
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Comments about John Keats

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  • Arundhathi (7/23/2018 9:35:00 AM)

    Add a comment Wonderful works...

  • Sneha (6/30/2018 9:50:00 AM)

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  • Harsh (6/28/2018 11:55:00 AM)

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  • Harsh (6/28/2018 11:49:00 AM)

    Nice poem by John Keats

  • jouni (6/25/2018 5:53:00 AM)

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  • Risha Gupta (5/24/2018 1:07:00 AM)

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  • Gulzar Hussain ranjoor (3/29/2018 12:48:00 AM)

    Nice and attractive poems

  • Grayson Goss (3/20/2018 1:46:00 PM)

    This poet has forver changed my life. No one else can write as he did. He is the Tom Bombadil of poetry. He is one of a kind. Every single line I read I can't help but shed a tear, not from sadness, but from amazement. I aspire to write poetry as Keats did. This sounds weird but i feel as if Keats will sometimes talk through me. A teacher once told me Listen class this is just a poem, and without hesitation Keats spoke through me and said it is never just a poem.
    -GraysonGossBoss

  • Joshua Adeyemi Joshua Adeyemi (3/4/2018 3:13:00 PM)

    My poems have often being liken to this man's poems...

    And I stopped to wait by... And see who he is...

    Well... He's one of them!

  • Fuck who made this web (2/27/2018 11:00:00 AM)

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Read all 68 comments »
Best Poem of John Keats

A Thing Of Beauty (Endymion)

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its lovliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o'er-darkn'd ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon, ...

Read the full of A Thing Of Beauty (Endymion)
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