John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

John Keats Quotes

  • ''Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
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  • ''My imagination is a monastery and I am its monk.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 16, 1820, to Percy Bysshe Shelley. Letters of John Keats, no. 227, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • ''There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify—so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, February 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • ''For the sake of a few fine imaginative or domestic passages, are we to be bullied into a certain philosophy engendered in the whims of an egotist?''
    John Keats (1705-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 3, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 44, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • ''Health is my expected heaven.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, March 1, 1820, to his fiancée Fanny Brawne. Letters of John Keats, no. 194, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Keats died of tuberculosis.
  • ''I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections, and the truth of imagination.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Nov. 22, 1817. Letters of John Keats, no. 31, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
  • ''"If I should die," said I to myself, "I have left no immortal work behind me—nothing to make my friends proud of my memory—that I have loved the principle of beauty in all things, and if I had had time I would have made myself remembered."''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 1820, to Fanny Brawne. Letters of John Keats, no. 186, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Describing his thoughts during his illness.

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Best Poem of John Keats

A Thing Of Beauty (Endymion)

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its lovliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o'er-darkn'd ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon, ...

Read the full of A Thing Of Beauty (Endymion)

To My Brothers

Small, busy flames play through the fresh laid coals,
And their faint cracklings o'er our silence creep
Like whispers of the household gods that keep
A gentle empire o'er fraternal souls.
And while, for rhymes, I search around the poles,
Your eyes are fix d, as in poetic sleep,
Upon the lore so voluble and deep,
That aye at fall of night our care condoles.
This is your birth-day Tom, and I rejoice

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