John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

John Keats Quotes

  • ''The Public ... a thing I cannot help looking upon as an enemy, and which I cannot address without feelings of hostility.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, April 9, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 60, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Keats continued, "I never wrote one single line of poetry with the least shadow of public thought." See also Keats's comment under "criticism, professional."
    12 person liked.
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  • ''Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, written Feb. 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    11 person liked.
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  • ''I would jump down Etna for any public good—but I hate a mawkish popularity.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, April 9, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 60, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    7 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''I am in that temper that if I were under water I would scarcely kick to come to the top.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, May 21-25, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 66, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    9 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''I equally dislike the favour of the public with the love of a woman—they are both a cloying treacle to the wings of independence.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    9 person liked.
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  • ''Who would wish to be among the commonplace crowd of the little famous—who are each individually lost in a throng made up of themselves?''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    5 person liked.
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  • ''Land and sea, weakness and decline are great separators, but death is the great divorcer for ever.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Sept. 30, 1820. Letters of John Keats, no. 239, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Written shortly after embarking from England on his last journey to Italy, where he succumbed to tuberculosis, Feb. 23, 1821.
    10 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Jan. 13-19, 1818, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 37, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    10 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, December 21, 1817, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 32, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    8 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity—it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 27, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 51, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    12 person liked.
    1 person did not like.

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Best Poem of John Keats

When I Have Fears

When I have fears that I may cease to be
Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain,
Before high-piled books, in charactery,
Hold like rich garners the full ripen'd grain;
When I behold, upon the night's starr'd face,
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance,
And think that I may never live to trace
Their shadows, with the magic hand of chance;
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour,
That I shall never look upon thee more,
Never have relish in the faery power
Of unreflecting love;...

Read the full of When I Have Fears

Ode

Bards of Passion and of Mirth,
Ye have left your souls on earth!
Have ye souls in heaven too,
Double lived in regions new?
Yes, and those of heaven commune
With the spheres of sun and moon;
With the noise of fountains wound'rous,
And the parle of voices thund'rous;
With the whisper of heaven's trees

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