John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

John Keats Quotes

  • ''The Public ... a thing I cannot help looking upon as an enemy, and which I cannot address without feelings of hostility.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, April 9, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 60, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Keats continued, "I never wrote one single line of poetry with the least shadow of public thought." See also Keats's comment under "criticism, professional."
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  • ''Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, written Feb. 14-May 3, 1819, to his brother and sister-in-law, George and Georgiana Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 123, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    11 person liked.
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  • ''I would jump down Etna for any public good—but I hate a mawkish popularity.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, April 9, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 60, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    7 person liked.
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  • ''I am in that temper that if I were under water I would scarcely kick to come to the top.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, May 21-25, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 66, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    9 person liked.
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  • ''I equally dislike the favour of the public with the love of a woman—they are both a cloying treacle to the wings of independence.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    9 person liked.
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  • ''Who would wish to be among the commonplace crowd of the little famous—who are each individually lost in a throng made up of themselves?''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Aug. 23, 1819. Letters of John Keats, no. 144, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    5 person liked.
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  • ''Land and sea, weakness and decline are great separators, but death is the great divorcer for ever.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Sept. 30, 1820. Letters of John Keats, no. 239, ed. Frederick Page (1954). Written shortly after embarking from England on his last journey to Italy, where he succumbed to tuberculosis, Feb. 23, 1821.
    10 person liked.
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  • ''There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Jan. 13-19, 1818, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 37, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    10 person liked.
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  • ''With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration, or rather obliterates all consideration.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. Letter, December 21, 1817, to his brothers George and Thomas Keats. Letters of John Keats, no. 32, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    8 person liked.
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  • ''Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity—it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.''
    John Keats (1795-1821), British poet. letter, Feb. 27, 1818. Letters of John Keats, no. 51, ed. Frederick Page (1954).
    12 person liked.
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Best Poem of John Keats

Ode On A Grecian Urn


Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness,
Thou foster-child of silence and slow time,
Sylvan historian, who canst thus express
A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme:
What leaf-fring'd legend haunts about thy shape
Of deities or mortals, or of both,
In Tempe or the dales of Arcady?
What men or gods are these? What maidens loth?
What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape?
What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy?

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter; ...

Read the full of Ode On A Grecian Urn

Hyperion

BOOK I
DEEP in the shady sadness of a vale
Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn,
Far from the fiery noon, and eve's one star,
Sat gray-hair'd Saturn, quiet as a stone,
Still as the silence round about his lair;
Forest on forest hung above his head
Like cloud on cloud. No stir of air was there,
Not so much life as on a summer's day