John Kenneth Galbraith

(1908-2006 / Iona Station, Ontario)

John Kenneth Galbraith Quotes

  • ''Much literary criticism comes from people for whom extreme specialization is a cover for either grave cerebral inadequacy or terminal laziness, the latter being a much cherished aspect of academic freedom.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. repr. In A View from the Stands (1986). "H.L. Mencken," Washington Post (September 14, 1980).
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  • ''Clearly the most unfortunate people are those who must do the same thing over and over again, every minute, or perhaps twenty to the minute. They deserve the shortest hours and the highest pay.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. Made to Last, ch. 4 (1964).
  • ''In economics, hope and faith coexist with great scientific pretension and also a deep desire for respectability.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. New York Times Magazine (June 7, 1970).
  • ''There is certainly no absolute standard of beauty. That precisely is what makes its pursuit so interesting.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. quoted in New York Times Magazine (Oct. 9, 1960).
  • ''The enemy of the conventional wisdom is not ideas but the march of events.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. First published (1958). Quoted in The Affluent Society, 1977 edition, introduction (1977).
  • ''Wealth, in even the most improbable cases, manages to convey the aspect of intelligence.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. Sydney Morning Herald (May 22, 1982).
  • ''It is a far, far better thing to have a firm anchor in nonsense than to put out on the troubled seas of thought.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. The Affluent Society, ch. 11, sct. 4 (1958). Referring to the resistance of conventional wisdom to "the economics of affuence."
  • ''Consumer wants can have bizarre, frivolous, or even immoral origins, and an admirable case can still be made for a society that seeks to satisfy them. But the case cannot stand if it is the process of satisfying wants that creates the wants.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. The Affluent Society, ch. 11, sct. 2 (1958).
  • ''Wealth is not without its advantages and the case to the contrary, although it has often been made, has never proved widely persuasive.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. The Affluent Society, ch. 1, sct. 1 (1958).
  • ''Money is a singular thing. It ranks with love as man's greatest source of joy. And with death as his greatest source of anxiety. Over all history it has oppressed nearly all people in one of two ways: either it has been abundant and very unreliable, or reliable and very scarce.''
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908), U.S. economist. The Age of Uncertainty, ch. 6 (1977).

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