John Locke

(1632_1704)

John Locke Quotes

  • ''A sound mind in a sound body, is a short, but full description of a happy state in this World: he that has these two, has little more to wish for; and he that wants either of them, will be little the better for anything else.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693). Opening sentence The famous prescription, mens sana in corpore sano, goes back to Juvenal (c. 60-130 A.D.).
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  • ''Things of this world are in so constant a flux, that nothing remains long in the same state.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. Two Treatises of Government, bk. 2, ch. 13, sect. 157, p. 372, ed. Peter Laslett, Cambridge University Press (1988).
  • ''Were it not for the corruption and viciousness of degenerate men, there would be no ... necessity that men should separate from this great and natural community, and by positive agreements combine into smaller and divided associations.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. Two Treatises of Government, bk. 2, ch. 9, sect. 128, p. 352, ed. Peter Laslett, Cambridge University Press (1988).
  • ''The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom. For in all the states of created beings capable of laws, where there is no law, there is no freedom.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. Two Treatises of Government, bk. 2, ch. 6, sect. 57, p. 305, ed. Peter Laslett, Cambridge University Press (1988).
  • ''New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, dedicatory epistle (1690).
  • ''When we consider the vast distance of the known and visible parts of the world, and the reasons we have to think, that what lies within our ken is but a small part of the universe, we shall then discover an huge abyss of ignorance.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, bk. 4, ch. 3, sect. 24, p. 554, ed. P. Nidditch, Oxford, Clarendon Press (1975).
  • ''Knowledge being to be had only of visible and certain truth, error is not a fault of our knowledge, but a mistake of our judgment, giving assent to that which is not true.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, bk. 4, ch. 20, sect. 1, p. 706, ed. P. Nidditch, Oxford, Clarendon Press (1975).
  • ''It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error, and another to put him in possession of the truth.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, bk. 4, ch. 7, sect. 11, ed. P. Nidditch, Oxford, Clarendon Press (1975).
  • ''Every drowsy nod shakes their doctrine, who teach, that the soul is always thinking.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, bk. 2, ch. 1, sect. 13, p. 111, ed. P. Nidditch, Oxford, Clarendon Press (1975).
  • ''To place liberty in an indifferency, antecedent to the thought and judgment of the understanding, seems to me to place liberty in a state of darkness, wherein we can neither see nor say any thing of it.''
    John Locke (1632-1704), British philosopher. An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, bk. 2, ch. 21, sect. 71, p. 282, ed. P. Nidditch, Oxford, Clarendon Press (1975).

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