John Milton

(9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674 / London, England)

John Milton Poems

Comments about John Milton

  • Rose Noir (9/4/2006 1:20:00 AM)

    'Did I request thee Maker from my clay to mould me man?
    Did I solicit thee from darkness to promote me? '

    -Adam's words after the fall quoted from Paradise Lost. I first read them years ago in the intro to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and they have remained with me ever since.

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Best Poem of John Milton

On His Blindness

When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
"Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?"
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: "God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o'er land and ocean without ...

Read the full of On His Blindness

To The Lady Margaret Ley

Daughter to that good Earl, one President
Of England’s Council and her Treasury,
Who lived in both unstained with gold or fee,
And left them both, more in himself content,
Till the sad breaking of that Parliament
Broke him, as that dishonest victory
At Chæronea, fatal to liberty,
Killed with report that old man eloquent,
Though later born than to have known the days

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