John Milton

(9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674 / London, England)

John Milton Quotes

  • ''None can love freedom heartily, but good men; the rest love not freedom, but licence.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Complete Prose Works of Milton, ed. Ernest Sirluck (1959). The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates (1649).
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  • ''No man who knows aught, can be so stupid to deny that all men naturally were born free.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Complete Prose Works of Milton, ed. Ernest Sirluck (1959). The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates (1649).
    148 person liked.
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  • ''A man may be a heretic in the truth; and if he believe things only because his pastor says so, or the assembly so determines, without knowing other reason, though his belief be true, yet the very truth he holds becomes his heresy.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
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  • ''I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
    45 person liked.
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  • ''Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
    59 person liked.
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  • ''When complaints are freely heard, deeply considered and speedily reformed, then is the utmost bound of civil liberty attained that wise men look for.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
    7 person liked.
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  • ''A good book is the precious lifeblood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Complete Prose Works of Milton, ed. Ernest Sirluck (1959). Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
    7 person liked.
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  • ''Adam inquires concerning celestial motions, is doubtfully answered, and exhorted to search rather things more worthy of knowledge.''
    John Milton (1608-1614), British poet. Paradise Lost, heading of bk. 8. See Milton under "Science" for the angel Raphael's "doubtful answer."
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  • ''Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Milton's Poetical Works, ed. Douglas Bush (1966). Phoebes, in Lycidas, l. 78 (1637).
    4 person liked.
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  • ''Lords are lordliest in their wine.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Samson Agonistes, l. 1418 (1671).
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Best Poem of John Milton

Sonnet Vii: How Soon Hath Time, The Subtle Thief Of Youth

How soon hath Time, the subtle thief of youth,
Stoln on his wing my three and twentieth year!
My hasting days fly on wtih full career,
But my late spring no bud or blossom shew'th.
Perhaps my semblance might deceive the truth,
That I to manhood am arrived so near,
And inward ripeness doth much less appear,
That some more timely-happy spirits endu'th.
Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow,
It shall be still in strictest measure even
To that same lot, however mean or high,
Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven;
All is, if I have ...

Read the full of Sonnet Vii: How Soon Hath Time, The Subtle Thief Of Youth

To My Lord Fairfax

Fairfax, whose Name in Arms through Europe rings,
And fills all Mouths with Envy or with Praise,
And all her Jealous Monarchs with Amaze.
And Rumours loud which daunt remotest Kings,
Thy firm unshaken Valour ever brings
Victory home, while new Rebellions raise
Their Hydra-heads, and the false North displays
Her broken League to Imp her Serpent Wings:
O yet! a Nobler task awaits thy Hand,

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