John Ruskin

(1819-1900 / England)

John Ruskin Quotes

  • ''Great nations write their autobiographies in three manuscripts--the book of their deeds, the book of their words, and the book of their art.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. St. Mark's Rest, preface (1877).
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  • ''Borrowers are nearly always ill-spenders, and it is with lent money that all evil is mainly done and all unjust war protracted.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Crown of Wild Olive, lecture 1 (1866).
  • ''Taste is the only morality.... Tell me what you like and I'll tell you what you are.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Crown of Wild Olive, lecture 2 (1866).
  • ''Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Eagle's Nest, ch. 5 (1872).
  • ''We may live without her, and worship without her, but we cannot remember without her. How cold is all history, how lifeless all imagery, compared to that which the living nation writes, and the uncorrupted marble bears!''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. "The Lamp of Memory," sect. 2, The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849). Referring to architecture.
  • ''An architect should live as little in cities as a painter. Send him to our hills, and let him study there what nature understands by a buttress, and what by a dome.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. "The Lamp of Power," sect. 24, The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1849).
  • ''Better the rudest work that tells a story or records a fact, than the richest without meaning.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Seven Lamps of Architecture, ch. 6 (1849).
  • ''Therefore, when we build, let us think that we build for ever.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Seven Lamps of Architecture, ch. 6 (1849).
  • ''I believe the right question to ask, respecting all ornament, is simply this: Was it done with enjoyment—was the carver happy while he was about it?''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Seven Lamps of Architecture, ch. 5 (1849).
  • ''The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love colour the most.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. 2, ch. 5, sct. 30 (1852).

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Best Poem of John Ruskin

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

Read the full of Trust Thou Thy Love

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

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