John Ruskin

(1819-1900 / England)

John Ruskin Quotes

  • ''We have much studied and much perfected, of late, the great civilized invention of the division of labour; only we give it a false name. It is not, truly speaking, the labour that is divided; but the men.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).
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  • ''Fine art is that in which the hand, the head, and the heart of man go together.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Two Paths, lecture 2 (1859).
  • ''You may either win your peace or buy it: win it, by resistance to evil; buy it, by compromise with evil.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Two Paths, lecture 5 (1859).
  • ''No human being, however great, or powerful, was ever so free as a fish.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Two Paths, lecture 5 (1859).
  • ''To make your children capable of honesty is the beginning of education.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Time and Tide, letter 8 (1867).
  • ''Your honesty is not to be based either on religion or policy. Both your religion and policy must be based on it. Your honesty must be based, as the sun is, in vacant heaven; poised, as the lights in the firmament, which have rule over the day and over the night.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Time and Tide, letter 8 (1867).
  • ''The first duty of a state is to see that every child born therein shall be well housed, clothed, fed and educated till it attains years of discretion.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British social critic. Time and Tide, Letter 13 (1867).
  • ''There is no wealth but life.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Unto This Last, essay 4 (1862).
  • ''Soldiers of the ploughshare as well as soldiers of the sword.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Unto This Last, essay 3 (1862).
  • ''That country is the richest which nourishes the greatest number of noble and happy human beings.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Unto This Last, essay 4 (1862).

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Best Poem of John Ruskin

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

Read the full of Trust Thou Thy Love

The Hills Of Carrara

Amidst a vale of springing leaves
Where spreads the vine its wandering root
And cumbrous fall the autumnal sheaves
And olives shed their sable fruit,
And gentle winds, and waters never mute,
Make of young boughs and pebbles pure
One universal lute.
And bright birds, through the myrtle copse obscure,
Pierce with quick notes, and plumage dipped in dew,

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