John Ruskin

(1819-1900 / England)

John Ruskin Quotes

  • ''Whereas it has long been known and declared that the poor have no right to the property of the rich, I wish it also to be known and declared that the rich have no right to the property of the poor.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Unto This Last, essay 3 (1862).
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  • ''Let us reform our schools, and we shall find little reform needed in our prisons.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Unto This Last, essay 2 (1862).
  • ''Architecture ... the adaptation of form to resist force.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Val d'Arno, ch. 6 (1874).
  • ''The distinguishing sign of slavery is to have a price, and to be bought for it.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. "War," The Crown of Wild Olive (1866).
  • ''Give a little love to a child, and you get a great deal back.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British writer.
  • ''Men don't and can't live by exchanging articles, but by producing them. They don't live by trade, but by work. Give up that foolish and vain title of Trades Unions; and take that of Labourers' Unions.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. open letter, Aug. 31, 1880, to the Trades Unions of England. published in Fors Clavigera, vol. 8 (Sept. 29, 1880).
  • ''Human work must be done honourably and thoroughly, because we are now Men;Mwhether we ever expect to be angels, or were ever slugs, being practically no matter.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 76 (1877).
  • ''There are no such things as Flowers—there are only gladdened Leaves.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 5 (1871).
  • ''The first duty of government is to see that people have food, fuel, and clothes. The second, that they have means of moral and intellectual education.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 67 (1876).
  • ''I have seen, and heard, much of Cockney impudence before now; but never expected to hear a coxcomb ask two hundred guineas for flinging a pot of paint in the public's face.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Letter, June 18, 1877. Fors Clavigera (1871-1884). Referring to Whistler's Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket, Oscar Wilde commented that the painting was "worth looking at for about as long as one looks at a real rocket, that is, for somewhat less than a quarter of a minute." Whistler took more seriously Ruskin's remarks which he made the subject of a law-suit. See Whistler on value.

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Best Poem of John Ruskin

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

Read the full of Trust Thou Thy Love

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

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