John Ruskin

(1819-1900 / England)

John Ruskin Quotes

  • ''Nothing can be true which is either complete or vacant; every touch is false which does not suggest more than it represents, and every space is false which represents nothing.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters I, pt. 2, sec. 2, ch. 5 (1843).
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  • ''To know anything well involves a profound sensation of ignorance.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters I, pt. 1, ch. 3 (1843).
  • ''That which is required in order to the attainment of accurate conclusions respecting the essence of the Beautiful is nothing more than earnest, loving, and unselfish attention to our impressions of it.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters II, pt. 3, sec. 1, ch. 3 (1846).
  • ''Nearly all our powerful men in this age of the world are unbelievers; the best of them in doubt and misery; the worst of them in reckless defiance; the plurality in plodding hesitation, doing, as well as they can, what practical work lies ready to their hands.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 16 (1856).
  • ''There is never vulgarity in a whole truth, however commonplace. It may be unimportant or painful. It cannot be vulgar. Vulgarity is only in concealment of truth, or in affectation.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 7 (1856).
  • ''All that we call ideal in Greek or any other art, because to us it is false and visionary, was, to the makers of it, true and existent.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 7 (1856).
  • ''All violent feelings have the same effect. They produce in us a falseness in all our impressions of external things, which I would generally characterize as the "pathetic fallacy."''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 12 (1856).
  • ''To see clearly is poetry, prophecy and religion—all in one.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters III, pt. 4, ch. 16 (1856).
  • ''The essence of lying is in deception, not in words.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters V, pt. 9, ch. 7 (1860).
  • ''All great and beautiful work has come of first gazing without shrinking into the darkness.''
    John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters V, pt. 9, ch. 2 (1860).

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Best Poem of John Ruskin

Trust Thou Thy Love

TRUST thou thy Love: if she be proud, is she not sweet?
Trust thou thy Love: if she be mute, is she not pure?
Lay thou thy soul full in her hands, low at her feet;
Fail, Sun and Breath!--yet, for thy peace, She shall endure.

Read the full of Trust Thou Thy Love

Night

Faint from the bell the ghastly echoes fall,
That grates within the grey cathedral tower;
Let me not enter through the portal tall,
Lest the strange spirit of the moonless hour
Should give a life to those pale people, who
Lie in their fretted niches, two and two,
Each with his head on pillowy stone reposed,
And his hands lifted, and his eyelids closed.

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