Jonathan Swift

(30 November 1667 – 19 October 1745 / Dublin)

Jonathan Swift Quotes

  • ''I cannot but conclude the bulk of your natives to be the most pernicious race of little, odious vermin that Nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. The king of Brobdingnag to Gulliver, in "A Voyage to Brobdingnag," ch. 6, Gulliver's Travels (1726).
    28 person liked.
    21 person did not like.
  • ''Where I am not understood, it shall be concluded that something very useful and profound is couched underneath.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. The Tale of a Tub, preface (1704).
    13 person liked.
    6 person did not like.
  • ''The most positive men are the most credulous.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Thoughts on Various Subjects (1711).
    5 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • ''Ambition often puts Men upon doing the meanest offices; so climbing is performed in the same position with creeping.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Thoughts on Various Subjects (1711).
    7 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). "Various Thoughts Moral and Diverting," Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711).
    15 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Censure is the tax a man pays to the public for being eminent.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). "Various Thoughts Moral and Diverting," Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Poor nations are hungry, and rich nations are proud; and pride and hunger will ever be at variance.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. "A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms," pt. 4, ch. 5, Gulliver's Travels (1726).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Once kick the world, and the world and you will live together at a reasonably good understanding.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Letter of Advice to a Young Poet (Dec. 1, 1720).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''A footman may swear; but he cannot swear like a lord. He can swear as often: but can he swear with equal delicacy, propriety, and judgment?''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Polite Conversation, introduction (1738).
    0 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''May you live all the days of your life.''
    Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. In The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, vol. 4, ed. Herbert Davis (1957). The Colonel, in Polite Conversation, dialogue 2 (1738).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of Jonathan Swift

A Maypole

Deprived of root, and branch and rind,
Yet flowers I bear of every kind:
And such is my prolific power,
They bloom in less than half an hour;
Yet standers-by may plainly see
They get no nourishment from me.
My head with giddiness goes round,
And yet I firmly stand my ground:
All over naked I am seen,
And painted like an Indian queen.
No couple-beggar in the land
E'er joined such numbers hand in hand.
I joined them fairly with a ring;
Nor can our parson blame the thing.
And though no marriage words are spoke,
They part not till the ring is ...

Read the full of A Maypole

The Progress Of Poetry

The Farmer's Goose, who in the Stubble,
Has fed without Restraint, or Trouble;
Grown fat with Corn and Sitting still,
Can scarce get o'er the Barn-Door Sill:
And hardly waddles forth, to cool
Her Belly in the neighb'ring Pool:
Nor loudly cackles at the Door;
For Cackling shews the Goose is poor.

[Report Error]