Joseph Addison

(1672-1719 / England)

Joseph Addison Quotes

  • ''Marriage enlarges the Scene of our Happiness and Miseries.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Spectator, No. 261 (1711).
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  • ''I think a Person who is thus terrifyed [sic] with the Imagination of Ghosts and Spectres much more reasonable, than one who contrary to the Reports of all Historians sacred and profane, ancient and modern, and to the Traditions of all Nations, thinks the Appearance of Spirits fabulous and groundless.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Spectator, No. 110 (1711).
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  • ''Good Nature, and Evenness of Temper, will give you an easie Companion for Life; Vertue and good Sense, an agreeable Friend; Love and Constancy, a good Wife or Husband. Where we meet one Person with all these Accomplishments, we find an Hundred without any one of them.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Spectator, No. 261 (1711).
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  • ''But to consider this Subject in its most ridiculous Lights, Advertisements are of great Use to the Vulgar: First of all, as they are Instruments of Ambition. A Man that is by no Means big enough for the Gazette, may easily creep into the Advertisements.... A Second Use which this Sort of Writings have been turned to of late Years, has been the Management of Controversy, insomuch that above half the Advertisements one meets with now-a-Days are purely Polemical.... The Third and last Use of these Writings is, to inform the World where they may be furnished with almost every Thing that is necessary for Life. If a Man has Pains in his Head, Cholicks in his Bowels, or Spots in his Clothes, he may here meet with proper Cures and Remedies.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British author. The Tatler, No. 224 (1710).
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  • ''Immortal glories in my mind revive,
    And in my soul a thousand passions strive,
    When Rome's exalted beauties I descry
    Magnificent in piles of ruin lie.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist and politician. A Letter from Italy (l. 8-13). . . Oxford Book of Travel Verse, The. Kevin Crossley-Holland, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''We envy not the warmer clime, that lies
    In ten degrees of more indulgent skies,
    Nor at the coarseness of our heaven repine,
    Though o'er our heads the frozen Pleiads shine:
    'Tis Liberty that crowns Britannia's Isle,
    And makes her barren rocks and her bleak mountains smile.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist and politician. A Letter from Italy (l. 8-13). . . Oxford Book of Travel Verse, The. Kevin Crossley-Holland, ed. (1986) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''With regard to donations always expect the most from prudent people, who keep their own accounts.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. "Economy and Benevolence," Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments (1794).
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  • ''The utmost extent of man's knowledge, is to know that he knows nothing.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. "Essay on Pride," Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments (1794).
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  • ''The important question is not, what will yield to man a few scattered pleasures, but what will render his life happy on the whole amount.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. "Happiness Not Independent," Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments (1794).
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  • ''There is not any present moment that is unconnected with some future one. The life of every man is a continued chain of incidents, each link of which hangs upon the former. The transition from cause to effect, from event to event, is often carried on by secret steps, which our foresight cannot divine, and our sagacity is unable to trace. Evil may at some future period bring forth good; and good may bring forth evil, both equally unexpected.''
    Joseph Addison (1672-1719), British essayist. "Happiness Not Independent" and Poetical Fragments, Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays (1794).
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Best Poem of Joseph Addison

Immortality

O Liberty! thou goddess, heavenly bright,
profuse of bliss and pregnant with delight,
Eternal pleasures in thy presence reign,
And smiling Plenty leads thy smiling train.
Eased of her load Subjection grows more light,
And Poverty looks cheerful in thy sight.
Giv'st beauty to the sun and pleasures to the day.
thee, goddess, thee, Britannia's isle adores!
How oft has she exhausted all her stores!
How oft on fields of death thy presence sought,
Nor thinks the mighty prize too dearly bought!
On foreign mountains may the sun refine
the grape's soft juice and ...

Read the full of Immortality

Ode

The spacious firmament on high,
With all the blue ethereal sky,
And spangled heav'ns, a shining frame,
Their great original proclaim:
Th' unwearied Sun, from day to day,
Does his Creator's power display,
And publishes to every land
The work of an Almighty Hand.

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