Kristin Prevallet


Biography of Kristin Prevallet

Kristin Prevallet (b. 1966 in Denver) is an American poet and essayist who currently lives and works in New York City. Prevallet studied with Robert Creeley at SUNY Buffalo and has described herself as working in the tradition of William Carlos Williams, Charles Olson and the ongoing stream of American high modernists. In recent years, she has appeared regularly at the Bowery Poetry Club, the venue which defined the New York downtown poetry scene in the late 1990s and early 2000s (decade). In her academic life, she has taught at Bard College, The New School for Social Research, and currently at St. John's University in Queens. She has also lectured and performed frequently at the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University (formerly The Naropa Institute) in Boulder, Colorado. She is also a literary translator of French, for which she was awarded a 2004 PEN Translation Fund Grant from PEN American Center.

Kristin Prevallet's Works:

Books
A Helen Adam Reader: Selected Poems, Collages and Music, edited with an introduction by Kristin Prevallet, The National Poetry Foundation, 2007.

I, Afterlife: Essay in Mourning Time, Essay Press, 2007.

Shadow Evidence Intelligence, Factory School, 2006.

Scratch Sides: Poetry, Documentation, and Image-Text Projects, Skanky Possum Press, 2003.

Perturbation, My Sister: A Study of Max Ernst's Hundred Headless Woman, First Intensity, 1997.

Chapbooks

Emulation Etudes New Haven, CT: Phylum Press, 2002.

Red, San Francisco, CA: Second Story Books, 2001.

Inside the Belly of the Iceman, Portland, ME: OASIA Broadside Series #84, 2001.

Selections from The Parasite Poems, Cambridge, UK: Barque Press, 1999.

Lead, Glass, and Poppy, Washington, DC: Primitive Publications, 1996.

28 for the Road, Buffalo, NY: Meow Press, 1995.

PoemHunter.com Updates

Dear George Bush

I am writing this letter just to inform you that the tide is turning.
It is a fickle tide,
one that has the presence of mind
to alter its course.
You may remember how just a year ago
many believed you to be illegitimate
(you still are).
Those were the days when your
slips of the tongue

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