Laurence Sterne

(1713-1768 / Clonmel)

Laurence Sterne Quotes

  • ''[I have] been in love with one princess or another almost all my life, and I hope I shall go on so, till I die, being firmly persuaded, that if ever I do a mean action, it must be in some interval betwixt one passion and another.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Montriul," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr. University of California Press (1967).
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  • ''So much of motion, is so much of life, and so much of joy—and ... to stand still, or get on but slowly, is death and the devil.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 7, ch. 13, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • ''When the precipitancy of a man's wishes hurries on his ideas ninety times faster than the vehicle he rides in—woe be to truth!''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 7, ch. 8, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • ''I have always observed, when there is as much sour as sweet in a compliment, that an Englishman is eternally at a loss within himself, whether to take it, or let it alone: a Frenchman never is.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy by Mr. Yorick (1768), ch. "Calais," ed. Gardner D. Stout, Jr., University of California Press (1967).
  • ''"It is with Love as with Cuckoldom"Mthe suffering party is at least the third, but generally the last in the house who knows any thing about the matter.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 8, ch. 4, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • ''It is a great pity—but 'tis certain from every day's observation of man, that he may be set on fire like a candle, at either end—provided there is a sufficient wick standing out.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 8, ch. 15, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • ''That of all the several ways of beginning a book which are now in practice throughout the known world, I am confident my own way of doing it is the best—I'm sure it is the most religious—for I begin with writing the first sentence—and trusting to Almighty God for the second.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 8, ch. 2, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • ''The French are certainly misunderstood:Mbut whether the fault is theirs, in not sufficiently explaining themselves; or speaking with that exact limitation and precision which one would expect ... or whether the fault may not be altogether on our side ... I shall not decide.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 7, ch. 18, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).
  • ''A large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in everything.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author. "In the Street—Calais," A Sentimental Journey (1768).
  • ''Always carry it in thy mind, and act upon it, as a sure maxim: "That women are timid:" And 'tis well they are—else there would be no dealing with them.''
    Laurence Sterne (1713-1768), British author, clergyman. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1765), vol. 8, ch. 34, eds. Melvyn New and Joan New, University of Florida Press (1978).

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