Louise J Kaplan

(1929_2012 / Brooklyn, New York City, New York)

Louise J Kaplan Quotes

  • ''Adolescence is the conjugator of childhood and adulthood.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Adolescence, ch. 3 (1984).
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  • ''The most significant change wrought by adolescence is the taming of the ideals by which a person measures himself. . . . Love of oneself becomes love of the species. Conscience is pointed to the future, whispering permission to reach beyond the safety net of our ordinary and finite human existence.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Adolescence, ch. 4 (1984).
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  • ''Children, even infants, are capable of sympathy. But only after adolescence are we capable of compassion.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Adolescence, ch. 12 (1984).
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  • ''Adolescence is the time to enlarge the natural sentiments of pity, friendship, and generosity, the time to develop an understanding of human nature and the varieties of human character, the time to gain insight into the strengths and weaknesses of all men and to study the history of mankind.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Adolescence, ch. 2 (1984).
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  • ''It didn't take elaborate experiments to deduce that an infant would die from want of food. But it took centuries to figure out that infants can and do perish from want of love.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. No Voice Is Ever Wholly Lost, ch. 1 (1995).
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  • ''Hopefulness is the heartbeat of the relationship between a parent and child. Each time a child overcomes the next challenge of his life, his triumph encourages new growth in his parents. In this sense a child is parent to his mother and father.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual, ch. 1 (1978).
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  • ''In every adult human there still lives a helpless child who is afraid of aloneness.... This would be so even if there were a possibility for perfect babies and perfect mothers.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual, ch. 7 (1978).
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  • ''Fathers represent another way of looking at life—the possibility of an alternative dialogue.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual, ch. 4 (1978).
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  • ''Paradoxically, the toddler's "No" is also a preliminary to his saying yes. It is a sign that he is getting ready to convert his mother's restrictions and prohibitions into the rules for behavior that will belong to him.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual, ch. 6 (1978).
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  • ''A man's fatherliness is enriched as much by his acceptance of his feminine and childlike strivings as it is by his memories of tender closeness with his own father. A man who has been able to accept tenderness from his father is able later in life to be tender with his own children.''
    Louise J. Kaplan (20th century), U.S. psychologist. Oneness and Separateness: From Infant to Individual, ch. 1 (1978).
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