Lucy Stone


Lucy Stone Quotes

  • ''The flour merchant, the house-builder, and the postman charge us no less on account of our sex; but when we endeavor to earn money to pay all these, then, indeed, we find the interest.''
    Lucy Stone (1818-1893), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Feminism: The Essential Historical Writings, part 3, by Miriam Schnier (1972). Extemporaneous remarks at the 1855 National Woman's Rights Convention in Cincinnati, Ohio.
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  • ''Leave women ... to find their sphere.''
    Lucy Stone (1818-1893), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Feminism: The Essential Historical Writings, part 3, by Miriam Schnier (1972). Extemporaneous remark at the 1855 National Woman's Rights Convention in Cincinnati, Ohio.
  • ''All over this land women have no political existence. Laws pass over our heads that we can not unmake. Our property is taken from us without our consent. The babes we bear in anguish and carry in our arms are not ours.''
    Lucy Stone (1818-1893), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 16, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage (1882). Speaking on May 14, 1863, at a national convention of the Woman's National Loyal League; Stone was president of the convention.
  • ''I believe that the influence of woman will save the country before every other power.''
    Lucy Stone (1818-1893), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 22, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage (1882). Arguing for woman suffrage at a May 12, 1869, anniversary celebration of the Equal Rights Association.
  • ''... we have every reason to rejoice when there are so many gains and when favorable conditions abound on every hand. The end is not yet in sight, but it can not be far away. The road before us is shorter than the road behind.''
    Lucy Stone (1818-1893), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 13, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902). From a letter read by her husband, suffragist Henry Blackwell, in 1893 to the twenty-fifth annual convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association. Stone had worked for woman suffrage since the beginning of the movement almost fifty years earlier; she died a few months after this convention. As "only" twenty-six years lay ahead before women would be granted suffrage, she was, technically, correct.

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