M. E. W Sherwood


M. E. W Sherwood Quotes

  • ''The young women, what can they not learn, what can they not achieve, with Columbia University annex thrown open to them? In this great outlook for women's broader intellectual development I see the great sunburst of the future.''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 19 (1897). On the expanding, though still far from equal, educational opportunities for New York City women.
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  • ''The radical changes in society from the small, well-considered hundreds to the countless thousands have of course destroyed the neighborly character of the strange conglomerate. It is more ornamental and much more luxurious now than then.''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 11 (1897). Comparing New York "society" of the 1870s and the 1890s.
  • ''English people ... are very kind, very friendly, interested in a general way, and consider us a great, wonderful, unknown sort of Australia, and that is all.''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 8 (1897).
  • ''... too many young painters of the day work for the crowd, and not for art. But, then, should not the painters of the day work for the education of the crowd?''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 13 (1897).
  • ''Time should be imaged with a paint-brush instead of a scythe; he knows how to wield the former even better than the latter.''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 8 (1897).
  • ''War is a most uneconomical, foolish, poor arrangement, a bloody enrichment of that soil which bears the sweet flower of peace ...''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 5 (1897).
  • ''The poor are always ragged and dirty, in very picturesque clothes, and on their poor shoes lies the earth of the Lacustrine period. And yet what a privilege it is to be even a beggar in Rome!''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 14 (1897). Sherwood, a born-rich member of New York City "society," seldom expressed such a romantic view of the poor, though she was always condescendingly benign toward them.
  • ''... the English are very fond of being entertained, and ... they regard the French and the American people as destined by Heaven to amuse them.''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 9 (1897).
  • ''The American is said to become full-flavored, and in time a most all-round man, through the polish which Europe can impart.''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 7 (1897).
  • ''This habit of free speaking at ladies' lunches has impaired society; it has doubtless led to many of the tragedies of divorce and marital unhappiness. Could society be deaf and dumb and Congress abolished for a season, what a happy and peaceful life one could lead!''
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826-1903), U.S. socialite, traveller, and author. An Epistle to Posterity, ch. 11 (1897).

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