Margaret Fuller


Margaret Fuller Quotes

  • ''Essays, entitled critical, are epistles addressed to the public, through which the mind of the recluse relieves itself of its impressions.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. writer, lecturer. "A Short Essay on Critics," Art, Literature and the Drama (1858).
    2 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''I stand in the sunny noon of life. Objects no longer glitter in the dews of morning, neither are yet softened by the shadows of evening.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. Quote from Woman in the Nineteenth Century. Brilliant Bylines, p. 15, Barbara Belford, Columbia University Press, New York (1986).
  • ''This was one of the rye-bread days, all dull and damp without.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. diary entry, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 104, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).
  • ''But the golden-rod is one of the fairy, magical flowers; it grows not up to seek human love amid the light of day, but to mark to the discerning what wealth lies hid in the secret caves of earth.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. journal entry, September 1840, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 99, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).
  • ''I am absurdly fearful about this voyage. Various little omens have combined to give me a dark feeling.... Perhaps we shall live to laugh at these. But in case of mishap I should perish with my husband and child, perhaps to be transferred to some happier state.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. letter, April 6, 1850, to Marchioness Visconti Arconati, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 274, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).
  • ''How many persons must there be who cannot worship alone since they are content with so little.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. letter, December 31, 1843, to Rev. W.H. Channing, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 184, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).
  • ''Men disappoint me so, I disappoint myself so, yet courage, patience, shuffle the cards ...''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. letter, February 21, 1841, to Rev. W.H. Channing, quoted in Margaret Fuller Ossoli, p. 112, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston (1898).
  • ''We doubt not the destiny of our country—that she is to accomplish great things for human nature, and be the mother of a nobler race than the world has yet known. But she has been so false to the scheme made out at her nativity, that it is now hard to say which way that destiny points.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. Life Without and Life Within, p. 108,"American Facts," ed. Arthur B. Fuller, Brown, Taggard and Chase, Boston (1860).
  • ''The use of criticism, in periodical writing, is to sift, not to stamp a work.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. author, literary critic, journalist. Papers on Literature and Art, p. 5, Wiley & Putnam, London (1846).
  • ''Beware of over-great pleasure in being popular or even beloved.''
    Margaret Fuller (1810-1850), U.S. writer, lecturer. Letter, December 20, 1840, to her brother. Quoted in Alice Rossi, The Feminist Papers (1973).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]