Marquis de Sade


Marquis de Sade Quotes

  • ''The heart deceives, because it is never anything but the expression of the mind's miscalculations ... I don't know what the heart is, not I: I only use the word to denote the mind's frailties.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Fifth," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
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  • ''The debility to which Nature condemned women incontestably proves that her design is for man, who then more than ever enjoys his strength, to exercise it in all the violent forms that suit him best, by means of tortures, if he be so inclined, or worse.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Fifth," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
  • ''One weeps not save when one is afraid, and that is why kings are tyrants.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Fifth," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
  • ''Are wars ... anything but the means whereby a nation is nourished, whereby it is strengthened, whereby it is buttressed?''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Fifth: Yet Another Effort, Frenchmen, If You Would Become Republicans," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
  • ''Lycurgus, Numa, Moses, Jesus Christ, Mohammed, all these great rogues, all these great thought-tyrants, knew how to associate the divinities they fabricated with their own boundless ambition.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Fifth: Yet Another Effort, Frenchmen, If You Would Become Republicans," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
  • ''Your daughter is old enough to do what she pleases ... she likes to fuck, loves to fuck ... she was born to fuck, and ... if you do not wish to be fucked yourself, the best thing for you to do is to let her do what she wants.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Seventh," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795). To Madame de Saint-Ange.
  • ''Get it into your head once and for all, my simple and very fainthearted fellow, that what fools call humaneness is nothing but a weakness born of fear and egoism; that this chimerical virtue, enslaving only weak men, is unknown to those whose character is formed by stoicism, courage, and philosophy.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Seventh," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
  • ''Ah, Eugénie, have done with virtues! Among the sacrifices that can be made to those counterfeit divinities, is there one worth an instant of the pleasures one tastes in outraging them?''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in "Dialogue the Third," Philosophy in the Bedroom (1795).
  • ''Destruction, hence, like creation, is one of Nature's mandates.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in Philosophy in the Bedroom, "Dialogue the Fifth," (1795). Real name: Comte Donatien-Alphonse-François.
  • ''Nature, who for the perfect maintenance of the laws of her general equilibrium, has sometimes need of vices and sometimes of virtues, inspires now this impulse, now that one, in accordance with what she requires.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Dolmancé, in Philosophy in the Bedroom, "Dialogue the Seventh," (1795).

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