Marquis de Sade


Marquis de Sade Quotes

  • ''Humane sentiments are baseless, mad, and improper; they are incredibly feeble; never do they withstand the gainsaying passions, never do they resist bare necessity.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Noirceuil, in L'Histoire de Juliette, ou les Prospérités du Vice, pt. 1 (1797).
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  • ''I've already told you: the only way to a woman's heart is along the path of torment. I know none other as sure.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. repr. In 120 Days of Sodom, and Other Writings, ed. and trans. by Austryn Wainhouse and Richard Seaver (1966). Oxtiern, in Oxtiern, ou les Malheurs du Libertinage, act 2, sc. 1 (1791).
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  • ''Evil is ... a moral entity and not a created one, an eternal and not a perishable entity: it existed before the world; it constituted the monstrous, the execrable being who was also to fashion such a hideous world. It will hence exist after the creatures which people this world.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Saint-Fond, in L'Histoire de Juliette, ou les Prospérités du Vice, pt. 2 (1797).
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  • ''Never lose sight of the fact that all human felicity lies in man's imagination, and that he cannot think to attain it unless he heeds all his caprices. The most fortunate of persons is he who has the most means to satisfy his vagaries.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Saint-Fond, in L'Histoire de Juliette, ou les Prospérités du Vice, pt. 2 (1797).
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  • ''Happiness lies neither in vice nor in virtue; but in the manner we appreciate the one and the other, and the choice we make pursuant to our individual organization.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Saint-Fond, in L'Histoire de Juliette, ou les Prospérités du Vice, pt. 2 (1797).
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  • ''Any punishment that does not correct, that can merely rouse rebellion in whoever has to endure it, is a piece of gratuitous infamy which makes those who impose it more guilty in the eyes of humanity, good sense and reason, nay a hundred times more guilty than the victim on whom the punishment is inflicted.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Letter, May 21, 1781, to his wife from Vincennes prison. Selected Letters, no. 8, ed. Margaret Crosland (1965).
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  • ''Hope is the most sensitive part of a poor wretch's soul; whoever raises it only to torment him is behaving like the executioners in Hell who, they say, incessantly renew old wounds and concentrate their attention on that area of it that is already lacerated.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Letter, February 20, 1781, to his wife, from Vincennes prison. Selected Letters, no. 7, ed. Margaret Crosland (1965).
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  • ''Miserable creatures, thrown for a moment on the surface of this little pile of mud, is it decreed that one half of the flock should be the persecutor of the other? Is it for you, mankind, to pronounce on what is good and what is evil?''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. Letter, January 26, 1782, from Vincennes prison. Selected Letters, no. 10, ed. Margaret Crosland (1965).
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  • ''Man's natural character is to imitate; that of the sensitive man is to resemble as closely as possible the person whom he loves. It is only by imitating the vices of others that I have earned my misfortunes.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. letter, Aug. 15, 1781, to his wife from Vincennes prison. Selected Letters, no. 9, ed. Margaret Crosland (1965).
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  • ''Sensual excess drives out pity in man.''
    Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French author. The Misfortunes of Virtue (1787).
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