Max Frisch

(1911-1991 / Zürich)

Max Frisch Quotes

  • ''There are all sorts of ways of murdering a person or at least his soul, and that's something no police in the world can spot.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Stiller, Suhrkamp (1954). Stiller, in I'm Not Stiller, second notebook, p. 111, trans. by Michael Bullock, Vintage (1958).
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  • ''Perhaps there are only a few women who experience without deception the overwhelming intoxication of the senses which they expect from their encounters with men, which they feel bound to expect because of the fuss made about it in novels, written by men.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Stiller, Suhrkamp (1954). Stiller, in I'm Not Stiller, second notebook, p. 83, trans. by Michael Bullock, Vintage (1958). The novel's crucial problem of male expectations of female sexuality.
  • ''Strictly speaking, every citizen above a certain level of income is guilty of some offense.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. from the play The Fire Raisers, originally published as Biedermann und die Brandstifter, Suhrkamp (1958) where titles in italics are actually underlined. I could not find the italics command in the notabene manual. Three Plays: The Fire Raisers, Andorra, Triptych, p. 25, trans. by Michael Bullock (1962), Methuen (1992).
  • ''I took the standpoint that the profession of technologist, a man who masters matter, is a masculine profession, if not the only masculine profession there is.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Walter Faber, in Homo FaberA Report, p. 75, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959).
  • ''Primitive peoples tried to annul death by portraying the human body—we do it by finding substitutes for the human body. Technology instead of mysticism!''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Walter Faber, in Homo FaberA Report, p. 75, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959).
  • ''I don't believe in providence and fate, as a technologist I am used to reckoning with the formulae of probability.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Walter Faber, in Homo FaberA Report, p. 23, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Describes the quintessential conviction of homo faber, modern man as technologist.
  • ''I live, like every real man, in my work.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Walter Faber, in Homo FaberA Report, p. 87, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959).
  • ''I knew that Ivy, like every woman, really only wanted to know what I felt—or thought, if I didn't feel anything.''
    Max Frisch (1911-1991), Swiss author, critic. Originally published as Homo faberEin Bericht, Suhrkamp (1957). Walter Faber, in Homo FaberA Report, p. 31, trans. by Michael Bullock (1977), Abelard-Schuman (1959). Typical of Faber's misogynist conviction.

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