Michel de Montaigne

(28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592)

Michel de Montaigne Quotes

  • ''Socrates ... brought human wisdom back down from heaven, where she was wasting her time, and restored her to man.... It is impossible to go back further and lower. He did a great favor to human nature by showing how much it can do by itself.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Physiognomy," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 12, Abel Langelier, Paris (1595).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''In the last scene, between death and ourselves, there is no more pretending: we must speak plain French.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "That our happiness must not be judged until after our death," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 19, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • ''The ceaseless labor of your life is to build the house of death.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. Essays, bk. 1, ch. 20 (1595).
  • ''By some might be said of me that here I have but gathered a nosegay of strange flowers, and have put nothing of mine unto it but the thread to bind them.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Physiognomy," bk. 3, ch. 12, Essays, trans. by John Florio (1588). Montaigne's essays are full of classical quotations.
  • ''Truly, it is not want, but rather abundance, that breeds avarice.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "That the taste of good and evil depends, for a good part, on the idea we have of them," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 14, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • ''A man should ever, as much as in him lieth, be ready booted to take his journey.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. Essays, bk. 1, ch. 19 (1580), trans. by John Florio (1603). Referring to the possibility of death.
  • ''Almost all the opinions we have are taken on authority and on credit.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Physiognomy," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 12, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).
  • ''A straight oar looks bent in the water. What matters is not merely that we see things but how we see them.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "That the taste of good and evil depends, for a good part, on the idea we have of them," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. I, ch. 14, Simon Millanges, Bordeaux, first edition (1580).
  • ''The value of life lies not in the length of days but in the use you make of them; he has lived for a long time who has little lived.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. Essays, bk. 1, ch. 20 (1595).
  • ''We perceive no charms that are not sharpened, puffed out, and inflated by artifice. Those which glide along naturally and simply easily escape a sight so gross as ours.''
    Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), French essayist. "Of Physiognomy," The Essays (Les Essais), bk. III, ch. 12, Abel Langelier, Paris (1588).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]